Los Gatos Chamber

Los Gatos Chamber

Los Gatos Events Calendar

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Calendar View
February 2017
Start Time - Feb-05-2017 @ 09:00 | End Time - Feb-05-2017 @ 13:00
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Farmer's Market

Every Sunday Farmer’s Market (Except Easter Sunday and Christmas Sunday)Los Gatos Town Plaza Park at Main and Santa Cruz Ave. Hours are 8:30 to 1:00 during the spring and summer months and 9:00 to 1:00 during fall and winter. 

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Start Time - Feb-12-2017 @ 09:00 | End Time - Feb-12-2017 @ 13:00
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Farmer's Market

Every Sunday Farmer’s Market (Except Easter Sunday and Christmas Sunday)Los Gatos Town Plaza Park at Main and Santa Cruz Ave. Hours are 8:30 to 1:00 during the spring and summer months and 9:00 to 1:00 during fall and winter. 

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Start Time - Feb-19-2017 @ 09:00 | End Time - Feb-19-2017 @ 13:00
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Farmer's Market

Every Sunday Farmer’s Market (Except Easter Sunday and Christmas Sunday)Los Gatos Town Plaza Park at Main and Santa Cruz Ave. Hours are 8:30 to 1:00 during the spring and summer months and 9:00 to 1:00 during fall and winter. 

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Start Time - Feb-26-2017 @ 09:00 | End Time - Feb-26-2017 @ 13:00
CHIcon

Farmer's Market

Every Sunday Farmer’s Market (Except Easter Sunday and Christmas Sunday)Los Gatos Town Plaza Park at Main and Santa Cruz Ave. Hours are 8:30 to 1:00 during the spring and summer months and 9:00 to 1:00 during fall and winter. 

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-03-2017 @ 08:30 | End Time - Feb-03-2017 @ 14:00
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Leadership Los Gatos 2016-17

Leadership Los Gatos is a 10-month program done in conjunction with the Town of Los Gatos to promote participation and a greater understanding of the workings of our Town and its part in the larger community.

The mission of the program is to engage, educate and
develop service-oriented individuals who live and/or work in Los Gatos for leadership roles in community and neighborhood organizations, schools, places of worship and Town government.

The program includes 10 half-day sessions beginning in the fall and ending in early June. There is a tuition fee for the program. Many employers will often sponsor their employees in this community program.

Because Leadership Los Gatos strives to have each incoming class reflect a cross-section of the community, applications will be screened to balance professional and community interests. Class size is limited to ensure quality class sections and full participation.

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Start Time - Feb-06-2017 @ 11:15 | End Time - Feb-06-2017 @ 12:00
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Yoga for Seniors

Yoga for Seniors is a mixed level class.  This is a great opportunity for seniors to do some Yoga exercises to help benefit breathing, joint flexibility, low back pain, etc.  This is a free flowing class where seniors are free to take breaks or sit out exercises as needed.  I will offer up modifications for exercises.  We will have chairs, for those that need a chair.  We will share in community with each other and take part in the benefits that the practice of yoga has to offer.  We will enjoy in spirit of fun while taking care of our bodies and wellness.  Come prepared in comfortable clothing, water, and whatever else you may need to help make the exercises more comfortable.
 
Instructor Nazanine Bain
Located:  Faith Lutheran Church Ross Hall
16548 Ferris Ave. Los Gatos
Contact the Church office for cost or other questions 408 356 5055

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Start Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 18:30 | End Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 20:00
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StoryShare

Come explore the art of storytelling. NUMU will host a monthly gathering celebrating the oral tradition of storytelling. Led by experienced members of the Storytelling Association of California (SAC), participants, from novice to expert, can both listen and have the opportunity to share their own stores. No experience necessary. Second Thursday of each month downstairs, in the NUMU Studio. Adult content, may not be appropriate for children.

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Start Time - Feb-19-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Feb-19-2017 @ 21:00
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Author Joel Hoffman at the JCC

Join us for a talk and dinner with Dr. Joel Hoffman, author of The Bible Doesn't Say That: 40 Biblical Mistranslations, Misconceptions, and Other Misunderstandings.

Tickets are $24 JCC member $36 non member.

Books will be available for purchase at the event. 

This is part of the JCC's Distinguished Speaker Series 2016-17.

For more information, contact [email protected] or 408.357.7411.

 


The APJCC is proud to be a part of the Initiative on Jewish Peoplehood, co-funded by the Koret Foundation and the Taube Foundation for Jewish Life & Culture, and supported further by the Jewish Federation of Silicon Valley and other generous supporters.

Joyce Goldstein, Michael Krasny, and Joel Hoffman will be visiting the APJCC as part of the Jewish Book Council's 2016-17 JBC Network Author Tours.

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Start Time - Feb-01-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-01-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-02-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-02-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-03-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-03-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-04-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-04-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-05-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-05-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-08-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-08-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-10-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-10-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-11-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-11-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-12-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-12-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-15-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-15-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-16-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-16-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-18-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-18-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-19-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-19-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-22-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-22-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-23-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-23-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-24-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-24-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-25-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-25-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-26-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Feb-26-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-01-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-01-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-04-2017 @ 07:45 | End Time - Feb-04-2017 @ 10:00
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The Club at Los Gatos Community Run

Come join us for our Club Community Run! 

Happening every other month on the second Saturday at 7:45AM (with the exception of the Turkey Run).  
This event is open to all members and non-members and will be a 5 mile run/jog or a 3 mile walk with snacks to follow.

The dates are as follows: 

January 14th
March 11th
July 8th
September 9th
November 24th - Turkey Run

To sign up, please e-mail Sophia Smith and [email protected] 

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-28-2017 @ 11:30 | End Time - Feb-28-2017 @ 13:00
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Biz to Biz Networking Luncheon - February 2017

Come join us for our Biz to Biz Networking Luncheon at the historic and beautiful Testarossa Winery. This event is a great opportunity to network with local business owners and professionals on your lunch hour!

Keynote speaker is Matt Mahood, President and CEO of Silicon Valley Organization (formerly the Silicon Valley Chamber of Commerce.)  He will talk about our current economic climate and the outlook for 2017.

Hope to see you!

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-03-2017 @ 13:00 | End Time - Feb-03-2017 @ 17:00
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Intro to Indigo Dyeing Drop-In | Ages 13 +

Explore the basics of dyeing indigo, learn new techniques, and practice creating patterns and varying color depth. Yards of muslin fabric will be provided, and participants are welcome to bring their own un-dyed cotton, linen, or silk fabrics as well. Please wear clothes you don't mind getting messy, as indigo will stain fabrics.

These workshops run every Friday in January & February.
For current event and program info for adults and kids, check out and subscribe to NUMU's Facebook Events: www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

About the Instructor:
Zoë Umholtz is a graduate of the Oregon College of Art and Craft in Portland Oregon majoring in Fiber Arts. She has been living in California for the past three years, and has been rediscovering her love for natural indigo dyeing and working with small, local communities.

MakerSpace Program Founding Sponsor: The Michael and Alyce Parsons Foundation
Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#LosGatosTown
#NUMU
#NewMuseumLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatos #SiliconValley #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #CraftLosGatos
#ThingsToDoInLosGatos #FridayFun #Tweens

Check out NUMU's events on Facebook!

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-10-2017 @ 13:00 | End Time - Feb-10-2017 @ 17:00
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Intro to Indigo Dyeing Drop-In | Ages 13 +

Explore the basics of dyeing indigo, learn new techniques, and practice creating patterns and varying color depth. Yards of muslin fabric will be provided, and participants are welcome to bring their own un-dyed cotton, linen, or silk fabrics as well. Please wear clothes you don't mind getting messy, as indigo will stain fabrics.

These workshops run every Friday in January & February.
For current event and program info for adults and kids, check out and subscribe to NUMU's Facebook Events: www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

About the Instructor:
Zoë Umholtz is a graduate of the Oregon College of Art and Craft in Portland Oregon majoring in Fiber Arts. She has been living in California for the past three years, and has been rediscovering her love for natural indigo dyeing and working with small, local communities.

MakerSpace Program Founding Sponsor: The Michael and Alyce Parsons Foundation
Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#LosGatosTown
#NUMU
#NewMuseumLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatos #SiliconValley #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #CraftLosGatos
#ThingsToDoInLosGatos #FridayFun #Tweens

Check out NUMU's events on Facebook!

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 13:00 | End Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 17:00
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Intro to Indigo Dyeing Drop-In | Ages 13 +

Explore the basics of dyeing indigo, learn new techniques, and practice creating patterns and varying color depth. Yards of muslin fabric will be provided, and participants are welcome to bring their own un-dyed cotton, linen, or silk fabrics as well. Please wear clothes you don't mind getting messy, as indigo will stain fabrics.

These workshops run every Friday in January & February.
For current event and program info for adults and kids, check out and subscribe to NUMU's Facebook Events: www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

About the Instructor:
Zoë Umholtz is a graduate of the Oregon College of Art and Craft in Portland Oregon majoring in Fiber Arts. She has been living in California for the past three years, and has been rediscovering her love for natural indigo dyeing and working with small, local communities.

MakerSpace Program Founding Sponsor: The Michael and Alyce Parsons Foundation
Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#LosGatosTown
#NUMU
#NewMuseumLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatos #SiliconValley #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #CraftLosGatos
#ThingsToDoInLosGatos #FridayFun #Tweens

Check out NUMU's events on Facebook!

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-24-2017 @ 13:00 | End Time - Feb-24-2017 @ 17:00
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Intro to Indigo Dyeing Drop-In | Ages 13 +

Explore the basics of dyeing indigo, learn new techniques, and practice creating patterns and varying color depth. Yards of muslin fabric will be provided, and participants are welcome to bring their own un-dyed cotton, linen, or silk fabrics as well. Please wear clothes you don't mind getting messy, as indigo will stain fabrics.

These workshops run every Friday in January & February.
For current event and program info for adults and kids, check out and subscribe to NUMU's Facebook Events: www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

About the Instructor:
Zoë Umholtz is a graduate of the Oregon College of Art and Craft in Portland Oregon majoring in Fiber Arts. She has been living in California for the past three years, and has been rediscovering her love for natural indigo dyeing and working with small, local communities.

MakerSpace Program Founding Sponsor: The Michael and Alyce Parsons Foundation
Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#LosGatosTown
#NUMU
#NewMuseumLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatos #SiliconValley #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #CraftLosGatos
#ThingsToDoInLosGatos #FridayFun #Tweens

Check out NUMU's events on Facebook!

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-04-2017 @ 13:00 | End Time - Feb-04-2017 @ 17:00
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Art Now Program | Portrait Drawing from Live Model

Begin or expand your skills in drawing people's faces from life. We will study and practice drawing a seated model in dramatic lighting, and learn the essential skills needed to demonstrate your ability to draw different human forms. This is highly valuable for students interested in animation, game design, or other graphic media. Class will include expert demonstrations and exercises.

Practice artistic observational skills and produce highly realistic drawings in a studio environment. Lessons will include classical methods of rendering form in graphite, charcoal and chalk on a variety of papers. These skills are applicable to all areas of art, including modern digital media.

• Age | High School
• $80
• Max capacity: 8 students. Pre-registration Required

For additional information and questions of any kind, please contact Gabriel Coke at 831- 345-1845 or by email at [email protected]

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#HighSchoolArt #HighSchoolPortfolio #ArtPortfolio #TeenArt #ArtCollegeAdmission #LosGatosArtClass #LosGatosHighSchoolArt #ApplyingToArtSchool

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-02-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Feb-02-2017 @ 20:00
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Let's Go to the Moon with Dennis Wingo + Casey Harper

This lecture is in conjunction with the McMoon Exhibit, open now - May 14th, 2017

“Let’s Go to the Moon!” In 1960, president Kennedy challenged the country to land a man on the moon by the end of the decade. In order to reach this daunting goal, NASA needed high-res photographs of the lunar surface to pinpoint the first Apollo moon landing. The images taken by the unmanned Lunar Orbiter in 1966 were almost lost to history until 2008, when a band of rogue scientists and some twelve-year-old summer interns worked together to save them in an abandoned McDonald’s building on the NASA campus. Come hear this lively tale of how this team saved lunar image history.

Mackenzie "Casey" Harper is the current Project Lead for LOIRP, where she began working as an intern in 2008 at age 12. LOIRP is where she developed her love for how engineering, machinery, and how things work. She then became fulfillment manager on the ISEE-3 Reboot Project in 2014, before becoming the LOIRP Project Lead. She will study robotics engineering at UCSC.

Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#LOIRP #LunarOrbiter #NASA #LosGatosArt #LosGatosTown #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValleyScience #TechThingsToSee #ThingsToDoLosGatos #SETI #SetiInstitute #ScienceArt #McMoon #DennisWingo #MoonLanding #NASAScientists #EagleHasLanded #MoonViews #NASACAmpus #CaseyHarper #MoonToday #NUMU #MuseumLosGatos

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Start Time - Feb-07-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Feb-07-2017 @ 20:00
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Town Council Meeting

The Los Gatos Town Council meet regularly on the first and third Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers.
 
Special meetings are called as necessary by the Mayor and noticed at least  24 hours in advance.

The public may review agenda and staff reports at the Los Gatos Library, 100 Villa Avenue or online at www.LosGatosCA.gov beginning at 7:00 p.m. the Thursday evening before each Council meeting, and at the Town Clerk's Office at 110 E. Main St. beginning Friday morning at 8:00 a.m.  The agenda and staff reports, including any additional material provided to Council after the distribution of the regular packet, are also available for viewing in the Council Chambers lobby during the Council meeting.

Written Comments
Members of the public may submit comments on Council agenda items via email, postal mail or hand-delivered prior to the Council meeting at which the item will be considered.  To ensure adequate time to prepare Council packets and adequate time for the Town Council to review public comments prior to the meeting, the Town Council has adopted the following policy:

  • For inclusion in the regular packet provided to Council Thursday evening, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. Thursday before the Council meeting.
  • For inclusion in any Addendum provided to Council Friday evening, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. Friday before the Council meeting.
  • For inclusion in any Desk Item provided to Council on the day of the Council meeting, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. on the day of the Council meeting.

Written comments should be sent to one or both of the following email addresses:
[email protected]
[email protected]

Or sent or hand-delivered to the following address:
Town Council
110 E. Main Street
Los Gatos, CA 95030

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-21-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Feb-21-2017 @ 23:55
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Town Council Meeting

Of the fifteen items on the agenda, the Town Council is scheduled to receive the 2016/17 Mid-Year Budget Performance and Status Report, approve plans and specifications for the Almond Grove Street Rehabilitation Project Phase II, and consider the Toll House Conditional Use Permit application. In addition, at 6:00 p.m. there will be a Building the Town's Budget: Budget Principles and Financial Update Study Session in Town Council Chambers.  



The Los Gatos Town Council meet regularly on the first and third Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers.
 
Special meetings are called as necessary by the Mayor and noticed at least  24 hours in advance.

The public may review agenda and staff reports at the Los Gatos Library, 100 Villa Avenue or online at www.LosGatosCA.gov beginning at 7:00 p.m. the Thursday evening before each Council meeting, and at the Town Clerk's Office at 110 E. Main St. beginning Friday morning at 8:00 a.m.  The agenda and staff reports, including any additional material provided to Council after the distribution of the regular packet, are also available for viewing in the Council Chambers lobby during the Council meeting.

Written Comments
Members of the public may submit comments on Council agenda items via email, postal mail or hand-delivered prior to the Council meeting at which the item will be considered.  To ensure adequate time to prepare Council packets and adequate time for the Town Council to review public comments prior to the meeting, the Town Council has adopted the following policy:

  • For inclusion in the regular packet provided to Council Thursday evening, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. Thursday before the Council meeting.
  • For inclusion in any Addendum provided to Council Friday evening, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. Friday before the Council meeting.
  • For inclusion in any Desk Item provided to Council on the day of the Council meeting, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. on the day of the Council meeting.

Written comments should be sent to one or both of the following email addresses:
[email protected]
[email protected]

Or sent or hand-delivered to the following address:
Town Council
110 E. Main Street
Los Gatos, CA 95030

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-08-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Feb-08-2017 @ 23:55
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Planning Commission Meeting

General Information
The Planning Commission performs duties and exercises power and authority with regard to planning, subdivisions, zoning, zoning administration, and other land use regulatory controls as prescribed by ordinance and state law.

The Planning Commission consists of seven residents of the Town of Los Gatos, each serving a 4-year term. Applicants are asked by Council to demonstrate knowledge of the Town Code and its land use and planning policies.

The commission has several standing committees, and individual Planning Commissioners also represent the commission on a number of Council-appointed committees. Committee terms are for 1 year and are appointed by the Planning Commission Chair.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-22-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Feb-22-2017 @ 23:55
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Planning Commission Meeting

General Information
The Planning Commission performs duties and exercises power and authority with regard to planning, subdivisions, zoning, zoning administration, and other land use regulatory controls as prescribed by ordinance and state law.

The Planning Commission consists of seven residents of the Town of Los Gatos, each serving a 4-year term. Applicants are asked by Council to demonstrate knowledge of the Town Code and its land use and planning policies.

The commission has several standing committees, and individual Planning Commissioners also represent the commission on a number of Council-appointed committees. Committee terms are for 1 year and are appointed by the Planning Commission Chair.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 18:30 | End Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 20:00
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Launch into Space: Rocket Building Workshop | Ages 7+

Come join us as we build and launch rockets off into space! Learn the basics of physics and rocket propulsion using skateboards and balloons. Then build and launch air rockets with glow sticks attached so we can watch them soar through the evening sky - and then find them to launch again!

- Pre-registration is required
- Cost: $20 for children of members | $25 For Children of Prospective Members
- Class size limited to 10. Families welcome.
- Ages 7 and under must be accompanied by an adult.

About the Instructor:
Elizabeth Greer has been working with elementary and middle school students for over 15 years. She is a long-time member and past president of the Art Docents of Los Gatos. An active Maker, Elizabeth enjoys exploring the intersection of art, science and technology with students while creating projects like rockets, digital art and photography, and LED artworks in classes at NUMU and the Los Gatos Recreation Department.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

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Start Time - Feb-21-2017 @ 17:30 | End Time - Feb-21-2017 @ 19:00
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Business After Hours at Grill 57

Join us for our next Mixer at Grill 57!

Grill 57 offers a unique touch on traditional American cuisine, emphasizing grilled favorites, gourmet pizzas and to go menu.  Features include a full bar, boutique wines, local draft beer and an amazing comfortable atmosphere.

Don't forget to bring your business cards for a fun door prize and try your hand at a raffle prize! Spaces are limited, please RSVP. $10 for Members & $20 Prospective Members. RSVP Required.

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Start Time - Feb-27-2017 @ 16:30 | End Time - Feb-27-2017 @ 18:00
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Board Meeting

Monthly Meeting of the Los Gatos Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 18:30 | End Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 20:00
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McCarthy Project Community Information Meeting

Community Information Meeting

McCarthy Project  Highway 9/ N. Santa Cruz Avenue
 
Meet with the developers on this pending new project.  You'll get to see the plans, ask questions and get the facts.  The developer would like to hear from you.
 
Links to the plans:
February 9 at 6:30pm at the History Club, 123 Los Gatos Blvd, Los Gatos

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 18:00 | End Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 20:00
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Dreamcatcher + Spirit Pouch Workshop | All Ages

Learn about the legend of the dreamcatcher. By forming a web of life with the sacred hoop, the dreamcatcher will capture your good thoughts, ideas, visions, and dreams. The hole in the hoop will allow the bad thoughts and negativity to pass through the web. Create your own dreamcatcher, either 6" or 12", all materials included.

Create a leather pouch for yourself or your loved ones, and learn to transform it to a medicine or spirit pouch by placing sacred items in it, giving it power.

Space is limited, please email [email protected] to save your spot for this workshop.
Payment will be accepted on the day of the workshop, and will be dependent upon what craft and the size of the craft you create.

You can also find this event on Facebook

Pricing:
Spirit pouch: $25
3in. dreamcatcher: $25
6in. dreamcatcher: $35
12in. dreamcatcher: $55

About the Instructor:
Pablo Diego Viramontes, nHanHu (Otomi Nation) is a renowned Native/Indigenous Craftsperson and Art Instructor who has exhibited his art regionally, nationally, and internationally. He received his MA., Lifetime Teaching Credential, and BA from San Jose State University. He retired from santa Clara County Office of Education, Alternative Schools Department with over 40 years experience working with "at risk" students. He is currently on the board with the Indian Health Center Santa Clara Valley He is an Advisor and leader, and drum caretaker of the 500 Mile American Indian Spiritual Marathon. His workshops include dreamcatchers, pouches, hand drums, powwow drums, ojo de dios, rattles, rainsticks, bead work and much more. Using ritual and ceremony in every workshop participants discover their gifts of "HANDS", helping theindividual/s rekindle the power of creativity and healing.

#LosGatosFamily #KidsLosGatos #FamilyWeekendSanJose #FamilyWeekendinSouthBay #KidsActivitiesinSouthBay #KidsActivitieininSanJose #KidsActivitiesinLosGatos #KidsArt #LosGatos #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValleyArt #ThingsToDowithKidsInTheSouthBay #NUMU #MuseumLosGatos #NativeAmericanArtforKids

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 18:30 | End Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 20:00
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Launch into Space: Rocket Building Workshop | Ages 7+

Come join us as we build and launch rockets off into space! Learn the basics of physics and rocket propulsion using skateboards and balloons. Then build and launch air rockets with glow sticks attached so we can watch them soar through the evening sky - and then find them to launch again!

- Pre-registration is required
- Cost: $20 for children of members | $25 For Children of Prospective Members
- Class size limited to 10. Families welcome.
- Ages 7 and under must be accompanied by an adult

You can share this event on Facebook

About the Instructor:
Elizabeth Greer has been working with elementary and middle school students for over 15 years. She is a long-time member and past president of the Art Docents of Los Gatos. An active Maker, Elizabeth enjoys exploring the intersection of art, science and technology with students while creating projects like rockets, digital art and photography, and LED artworks in classes at NUMU and the Los Gatos Recreation Department.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-16-2017 @ 18:00 | End Time - Feb-16-2017 @ 20:00
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Make + Mingle | Valentine's Second Chance with Lexington House | 21+

We will be serving up a specialty love potion generously offered by The Lexington House with a complementary arts + craft chaser. Explore the galleries and check out the Black Box Theater's current film screening. Oh, and bring your friends! Share this event with your friends on Facebook!

Buy your tickets in advance!
Ticket includes gallery admission, two drinks, craft project and materials. Wine and water will also be served.
Your ticket(s) will be reserved under your name and available at the door.

#MakeAndMingle #LosGatosMade #LosGatosArt #LosGatosTown #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #LosGatosNightLife #ThingsToDoInLosGatos #NUMU #MuseumLosGatos

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Start Time - Feb-10-2017 @ 20:30 | End Time - Feb-10-2017 @ 22:00
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Comedy Night @ C.B. Hannegan's

Saratoga/ Los Gatos native Joey Avery brings the best of the Bay Area standup comedy scene to Los Gatos for one night at C.B. Hannegan's!

The show will be February 10th at 8:30pm and will be starring Kellen Erskine of America's Got Talent, who regularly tours with Fox NFL Sunday's Frank Caliendo.

$15 Advance Sales/ $20 at the door. Online purchases recommended as the event has a high sellout risk. 

Tickets can be purchased at: www.lgcomedynight.com

The content of the show is uncensored and for adult audiences only.  

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-23-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Feb-23-2017 @ 20:00
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Visualizing Kepler's Dream | Somnium Presentation

Using computer graphics simulations, this talk illustrates the first science fiction story: Johannes Kepler's Somnium (1634). A dreamer imagines a fanciful voyage to the moon, accompanied by his bewitching mother and guided by a helpful demon. From sunrises to seasons to extraterrestrials, Kepler's narrator describes what it would be like to see the cosmos from an off-world point of view. Danny Bazo, Karl Yerkes, and Marko Peljhan will also answer questions about their piece in Making Contact: SETI Artists in Residence.

The artist team of Danny Bazo, Karl Yerkes, and Marko Peljhan, from the Systemics Lab in the Media Arts and Technology Program at UC Santa Barbara, have collaborated with NASA and SETI scientist Jon Jenkins on SOMNIUM: A SETI AIR Project, a work motivated by the Kepler Space Telescope and the search for Earth-like exoplanets.

*Arrive 20 minuets early to enjoy the exhibit before the talk.
**The Lecture is Free with Admission

Be the first to know about great talks, exhibit openings and programs for kids and adults! Subscribe to NUMU's Facebook events page. www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

Admissions
FREE for members and visitors under 18 years of age
General Admission is $10
$6 Seniors, military and students with valid ID

Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#TalkNerdToMe #GeekSpeak #CanScienceBeArt #NASAArt #ArtLosGatos #SiliconValley #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #ThingsToDoLosGatos #SETI #SetiInstitute #MakingContact #ScienceArt #universe #universetoday #SciFri

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Start Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 10:00 | End Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 12:00
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IS YOUR HEARING DEVICE WORKING FOR YOU? FIND OUT AND GET A FREE CLEAN & CHECK.

The Listen Up Café presents Christine Throm, Au.D., Friday, February 17th 10-12pm

Come by and learn the simple steps to enhance your hearing device performance. We’ll discuss tips for maintaining your hearing device through daily cleaning and regular service. Plus, you’ll discover how proper care promotes optimum hearing, extends the life of your hearing device, and ensures proper hygiene.

RSVP (408) 354-1312 for your FREE Clean & Check and enjoy great coffee and goodies!

Los Gatos Audiology – 430 Monterey Ave, Suite 3, Los Gatos, CA 95030

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Start Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 17:00
Start Time - Feb-19-2017 @ 10:00 | End Time - Feb-19-2017 @ 12:00
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"Back to Camp" Summer Camp Preview at the JCC

Learn all about the JCC's Camp Shalom! Join our Summer Camp Staff and Directors for a morning of fun  camp activities. Whether it's expressing your creativity in Arts & Crafts or conducting scientific experiments, you?ll get a sample of some of the fun and excitement we have in store for you this coming summer. Complimentary brunch will be served. Returning and prospective campers (ages 18 months-16 years) and their families are invited.

More info: www.campshalomjcc.org
 

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Start Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 18:00 | End Time - Feb-09-2017 @ 20:00
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VTA Community Meeting

Come hear the latest Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) news at the Town's Transportation & Parking Commission Meeting on Thursday, February 9th at 6:00 pm in the Council Chambers.

The VTA is redesigning it's transportation network service delivery, including bus service reductions within Los Gatos. VTA calls this program the Next Network. The Town has invited VTA to make a presentation on the plan to the Towns Transportation & Parking Commission. This meeting is open to the public and public participation is encouraged. Don't miss this opportunity to provide input into the future of Los Gatos bus service.
If you cannot make this meeting, VTA is holding webinars and additional meetings throughout the County. More information can be found on the Next Network webpage:  http://www.vta.org/projects-and-programs/transit/next-network

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Start Time - Feb-16-2017 @ 06:00 | End Time - Feb-16-2017 @ 09:00
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MCP's Annual Arts and Awards Ceremony and Information NIght

Our annual Arts and Awards/Information Night is a great way to see what our students do at MCP. Each classroom is set up with students individual projects, there will be a musical performances, improv performances, and hands on science experiments. Current MCP families and potential students and their families are free to mingle about during the evening. We highly encourage anyone interested in attending our school, as well as past alum to attend as well. This is one of our favorite school events of the year.  

RSVP here

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-11-2017 @ 12:00 | End Time - Feb-11-2017 @ 16:00
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MakerSpace Open Studio Weekends

Every Saturday and Sunday from 12pm-4pm check out what we're building, making, and creating in our Open Studio hours! NUMU's Open Studio offers visitors of all ages a hands-on opportunity to explore, discover and create. Ages 4+, all children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult.

*$5 Material Fee for kids | Museum Admission price appiles to adults.
**No new entries to MakerSpace after 3:30pm.
***For more the latest activity, workshop or event updates subscribe to NUMU's Facebook Events: www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

Activities Descriptions for February
DIY Valentines
Saturday + Sunday February 11-12
Make your own Valentines cards for your favorite people! We'll have collage and cardmaking supplies, paper lace, stamp embossing (and tutorials) and even printmaking to make your own fantastical valentines.

Kid Inventors Day
Saturday + Sunday February 18-19
Celebrate Kid Inventors Day with a tinkering workshop at NUMU. We’ll have a jar of “problems” for your young inventor to solve using cardboard, tape, straws, sticks, and who knows what else!

Makers' Mardi Gras
Saturday + Sunday February 25-26
Let the good times roll, Mardi Gras-MakerSpace style! Bring in a shoebox to decorate your own mini-Mardi Gras float, make a mask, and create a special jester hat to wear for Mardi Gras.

MakerSpace Program Founding Sponsor: The Michael and Alyce Parsons Foundation
Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-161960

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-12-2017 @ 12:00 | End Time - Feb-12-2017 @ 16:00
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MakerSpace Open Studio Weekends

Every Saturday and Sunday from 12pm-4pm check out what we're building, making, and creating in our Open Studio hours! NUMU's Open Studio offers visitors of all ages a hands-on opportunity to explore, discover and create. Ages 4+, all children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult.

*$5 Material Fee for kids | Museum Admission price appiles to adults.
**No new entries to MakerSpace after 3:30pm.
***For more the latest activity, workshop or event updates subscribe to NUMU's Facebook Events: www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

Activities Descriptions for February
DIY Valentines
Saturday + Sunday February 11-12
Make your own Valentines cards for your favorite people! We'll have collage and cardmaking supplies, paper lace, stamp embossing (and tutorials) and even printmaking to make your own fantastical valentines.

Kid Inventors Day
Saturday + Sunday February 18-19
Celebrate Kid Inventors Day with a tinkering workshop at NUMU. We’ll have a jar of “problems” for your young inventor to solve using cardboard, tape, straws, sticks, and who knows what else!

Makers' Mardi Gras
Saturday + Sunday February 25-26
Let the good times roll, Mardi Gras-MakerSpace style! Bring in a shoebox to decorate your own mini-Mardi Gras float, make a mask, and create a special jester hat to wear for Mardi Gras.

MakerSpace Program Founding Sponsor: The Michael and Alyce Parsons Foundation
Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-161960

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-18-2017 @ 12:00 | End Time - Feb-18-2017 @ 16:00
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MakerSpace Open Studio Weekends

Every Saturday and Sunday from 12pm-4pm check out what we're building, making, and creating in our Open Studio hours! NUMU's Open Studio offers visitors of all ages a hands-on opportunity to explore, discover and create. Ages 4+, all children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult.

*$5 Material Fee for kids | Museum Admission price appiles to adults.
**No new entries to MakerSpace after 3:30pm.
***For more the latest activity, workshop or event updates subscribe to NUMU's Facebook Events: www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

Activities Descriptions for February
DIY Valentines
Saturday + Sunday February 11-12
Make your own Valentines cards for your favorite people! We'll have collage and cardmaking supplies, paper lace, stamp embossing (and tutorials) and even printmaking to make your own fantastical valentines.

Kid Inventors Day
Saturday + Sunday February 18-19
Celebrate Kid Inventors Day with a tinkering workshop at NUMU. We’ll have a jar of “problems” for your young inventor to solve using cardboard, tape, straws, sticks, and who knows what else!

Makers' Mardi Gras
Saturday + Sunday February 25-26
Let the good times roll, Mardi Gras-MakerSpace style! Bring in a shoebox to decorate your own mini-Mardi Gras float, make a mask, and create a special jester hat to wear for Mardi Gras.

MakerSpace Program Founding Sponsor: The Michael and Alyce Parsons Foundation
Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-161960

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-19-2017 @ 12:00 | End Time - Feb-19-2017 @ 16:00
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MakerSpace Open Studio Weekends

Every Saturday and Sunday from 12pm-4pm check out what we're building, making, and creating in our Open Studio hours! NUMU's Open Studio offers visitors of all ages a hands-on opportunity to explore, discover and create. Ages 4+, all children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult.

*$5 Material Fee for kids | Museum Admission price appiles to adults.
**No new entries to MakerSpace after 3:30pm.
***For more the latest activity, workshop or event updates subscribe to NUMU's Facebook Events: www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

Activities Descriptions for February
DIY Valentines
Saturday + Sunday February 11-12
Make your own Valentines cards for your favorite people! We'll have collage and cardmaking supplies, paper lace, stamp embossing (and tutorials) and even printmaking to make your own fantastical valentines.

Kid Inventors Day
Saturday + Sunday February 18-19
Celebrate Kid Inventors Day with a tinkering workshop at NUMU. We’ll have a jar of “problems” for your young inventor to solve using cardboard, tape, straws, sticks, and who knows what else!

Makers' Mardi Gras
Saturday + Sunday February 25-26
Let the good times roll, Mardi Gras-MakerSpace style! Bring in a shoebox to decorate your own mini-Mardi Gras float, make a mask, and create a special jester hat to wear for Mardi Gras.

MakerSpace Program Founding Sponsor: The Michael and Alyce Parsons Foundation
Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-161960

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-25-2017 @ 12:00 | End Time - Feb-25-2017 @ 16:00
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MakerSpace Open Studio Weekends

Every Saturday and Sunday from 12pm-4pm check out what we're building, making, and creating in our Open Studio hours! NUMU's Open Studio offers visitors of all ages a hands-on opportunity to explore, discover and create. Ages 4+, all children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult.

*$5 Material Fee for kids | Museum Admission price appiles to adults.
**No new entries to MakerSpace after 3:30pm.
***For more the latest activity, workshop or event updates subscribe to NUMU's Facebook Events: www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

Activities Descriptions for February
DIY Valentines
Saturday + Sunday February 11-12
Make your own Valentines cards for your favorite people! We'll have collage and cardmaking supplies, paper lace, stamp embossing (and tutorials) and even printmaking to make your own fantastical valentines.

Kid Inventors Day
Saturday + Sunday February 18-19
Celebrate Kid Inventors Day with a tinkering workshop at NUMU. We’ll have a jar of “problems” for your young inventor to solve using cardboard, tape, straws, sticks, and who knows what else!

Makers' Mardi Gras
Saturday + Sunday February 25-26
Let the good times roll, Mardi Gras-MakerSpace style! Bring in a shoebox to decorate your own mini-Mardi Gras float, make a mask, and create a special jester hat to wear for Mardi Gras.

MakerSpace Program Founding Sponsor: The Michael and Alyce Parsons Foundation
Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-161960

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-26-2017 @ 12:00 | End Time - Feb-26-2017 @ 16:00
CHIcon

MakerSpace Open Studio Weekends

Every Saturday and Sunday from 12pm-4pm check out what we're building, making, and creating in our Open Studio hours! NUMU's Open Studio offers visitors of all ages a hands-on opportunity to explore, discover and create. Ages 4+, all children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult.

*$5 Material Fee for kids | Museum Admission price appiles to adults.
**No new entries to MakerSpace after 3:30pm.
***For more the latest activity, workshop or event updates subscribe to NUMU's Facebook Events: www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

Activities Descriptions for February
DIY Valentines
Saturday + Sunday February 11-12
Make your own Valentines cards for your favorite people! We'll have collage and cardmaking supplies, paper lace, stamp embossing (and tutorials) and even printmaking to make your own fantastical valentines.

Kid Inventors Day
Saturday + Sunday February 18-19
Celebrate Kid Inventors Day with a tinkering workshop at NUMU. We’ll have a jar of “problems” for your young inventor to solve using cardboard, tape, straws, sticks, and who knows what else!

Makers' Mardi Gras
Saturday + Sunday February 25-26
Let the good times roll, Mardi Gras-MakerSpace style! Bring in a shoebox to decorate your own mini-Mardi Gras float, make a mask, and create a special jester hat to wear for Mardi Gras.

MakerSpace Program Founding Sponsor: The Michael and Alyce Parsons Foundation
Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-161960

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 18:00 | End Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 21:00
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BEGINNING BEEKEEPING I Classroom Workshop

Discover the basics of what you need to begin backyard beekeeping, from sourcing your bees, to constructing the hive, to preventing bee swarming and harvesting  honey. This 3 hour classroom workshop will provide you with the terminology and basics needed to become a successful beekeeper. You will learn to identify the different types of bees and brood cells and what a healthy hive needs from you to thrive. You will learn what takes place during different seasons, from starting your hive in the spring to winterizing. You will learn what equipment is needed and why. This classroom workshop is part of a 2 part series and is a pre-requisite to the Apiary School. If you wish to take ONLY the classroom workshop you may choose to do so. 

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-25-2017 @ 18:30 | End Time - Feb-25-2017 @ 23:00
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Los Gatos Monte Sereno Police Officers Ball

The Los Gatos-Monte Sereno Police Foundation requests
your presence at the
Inaugural Police Officer's Ball

6:30 - 11:00 pm
Saturday, February, 25th
$150 per person includes
Great Jazz Music, Song & Dancing
by
Don Olivette with Full Spectrum Jazz Quartet
&
Grammy nominated vocalist Vernelle Anders
at
Testarossa Winery
for
An elegant evening with world class wines, appatizers, formal dinner & live music


Join us in this important gesture in support of our
Los Gatos-Monte Sereno Police officers and programs.

Attire is formal (Black Tie Optional)

If you are unable to attend but would like to contribute
you may sponsor an officer for dinner or make a donationto the foundation in any amount.

www.lgmspf.org

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 06:00 | End Time - Feb-17-2017 @ 07:00
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6 AM High Energy Spin Class

Join one of our top instructors, Pete Keady, as he takes you through a 60 minute inspirational ride!  Sweat your way through an expertly choreographed class filled with sprints, hills and drills.  The ride is complimented with a playlist that will keep your energy pumping and motivate you throughout the entire class!  Burn calories, feel inspired and ride alondside your friends! 

Contact Sophia Smith to reserve your seat today! 

408-354-5808
[email protected]

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Feb-24-2017 @ 06:00 | End Time - Feb-24-2017 @ 07:00
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6 AM High Energy Spin Class

Join one of our top instructors, Pete Keady, as he takes you through a 60 minute inspirational ride!  Sweat your way through an expertly choreographed class filled with sprints, hills and drills.  The ride is complimented with a playlist that will keep your energy pumping and motivate you throughout the entire class!  Burn calories, feel inspired and ride alondside your friends! 

Contact Sophia Smith to reserve your seat today! 

408-354-5808
[email protected]

Event Details / Register

farmers market

Ongoing events in Los Gatos

The Farmer's Market

Check out the Los Gatos Farmer’s Market every Sunday (except Easter Sunday and Christmas Sunday). It is located around Plaza Park in downtown Los Gatos, on Montebello Way and Broadway Ave.
Hours are from 8:30am to 1:00pm during the Spring and Summer months and 9:00am to 1:00pm during Fall and Winter.
Contact South Bay Farmers’ Market at 408-353-4293.

Great classes at...

Los Gatos/Saratoga Rec. Center (354-8700)
LGS Recreation and Jewish Community Center (358-3636)- JCC
West Valley College - www.westvalley.edu