Los Gatos Chamber

Los Gatos Chamber

Los Gatos Events Calendar

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Calendar View
March 2017
Start Time - Mar-05-2017 @ 09:00 | End Time - Mar-05-2017 @ 13:00
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Farmer's Market

Every Sunday Farmer’s Market (Except Easter Sunday and Christmas Sunday)Los Gatos Town Plaza Park at Main and Santa Cruz Ave. Hours are 8:30 to 1:00 during the spring and summer months and 9:00 to 1:00 during fall and winter. 

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-12-2017 @ 09:00 | End Time - Mar-12-2017 @ 13:00
CHIcon

Farmer's Market

Every Sunday Farmer’s Market (Except Easter Sunday and Christmas Sunday)Los Gatos Town Plaza Park at Main and Santa Cruz Ave. Hours are 8:30 to 1:00 during the spring and summer months and 9:00 to 1:00 during fall and winter. 

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Start Time - Mar-19-2017 @ 09:00 | End Time - Mar-19-2017 @ 13:00
CHIcon

Farmer's Market

Every Sunday Farmer’s Market (Except Easter Sunday and Christmas Sunday)Los Gatos Town Plaza Park at Main and Santa Cruz Ave. Hours are 8:30 to 1:00 during the spring and summer months and 9:00 to 1:00 during fall and winter. 

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Start Time - Mar-26-2017 @ 09:00 | End Time - Mar-26-2017 @ 13:00
CHIcon

Farmer's Market

Every Sunday Farmer’s Market (Except Easter Sunday and Christmas Sunday)Los Gatos Town Plaza Park at Main and Santa Cruz Ave. Hours are 8:30 to 1:00 during the spring and summer months and 9:00 to 1:00 during fall and winter. 

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-24-2017 @ 08:30 | End Time - Mar-24-2017 @ 14:00
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Leadership Los Gatos 2016-17

Rescheduled Date for Session #5: Economic Vitality

Leadership Los Gatos is a 10-month program done in conjunction with the Town of Los Gatos to promote participation and a greater understanding of the workings of our Town and its part in the larger community.

The mission of the program is to engage, educate and
develop service-oriented individuals who live and/or work in Los Gatos for leadership roles in community and neighborhood organizations, schools, places of worship and Town government.

The program includes 10 half-day sessions beginning in the fall and ending in early June. There is a tuition fee for the program. Many employers will often sponsor their employees in this community program.

Because Leadership Los Gatos strives to have each incoming class reflect a cross-section of the community, applications will be screened to balance professional and community interests. Class size is limited to ensure quality class sections and full participation.

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Start Time - Mar-03-2017 @ 08:30 | End Time - Mar-03-2017 @ 14:00
CHIcon

Leadership Los Gatos 2016-17

Leadership Los Gatos is a 10-month program done in conjunction with the Town of Los Gatos to promote participation and a greater understanding of the workings of our Town and its part in the larger community.

The mission of the program is to engage, educate and
develop service-oriented individuals who live and/or work in Los Gatos for leadership roles in community and neighborhood organizations, schools, places of worship and Town government.

The program includes 10 half-day sessions beginning in the fall and ending in early June. There is a tuition fee for the program. Many employers will often sponsor their employees in this community program.

Because Leadership Los Gatos strives to have each incoming class reflect a cross-section of the community, applications will be screened to balance professional and community interests. Class size is limited to ensure quality class sections and full participation.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-10-2017 @ 09:00 | End Time - Mar-10-2017 @ 10:30
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Social Media Workshop Series

Join us for the next Los Gatos Chamber Social Media workshop, on Friday, March 10 9:00am-10:30am at the Los Gatos Chamber of Commerce office. 

Instagram Basics & Best Practices at Los Gatos Chamber of Commerce on Friday, March 10, 9:00am-10:30am at the Los Gatos Chamber office. Our "Featured Los Gatos Non-Profit" will be Los Gatos Bicycle Racing Club. They produce the wonderful Cat's Hill Classic. This is a FREE event for Los Gatos Chamber Members. Seating is limited to 30, so preregistration is required.

Instagram now exceeds 500 million users and seems to have the fastest engagement of social media platforms. We will discuss basic usage of Instagram; posting, commenting, liking, and sharing. Gaining Followers and having some fun with hashtags. This is a casual, fun group that is motivated to learn more about social media.


We strongly encourage you to create an Instagram account prior to attending this training. During the meeting we won't have time to walk you through creating an account, but will gladly assist, if needed, before the group training.


Instagram is a mobile focused platform and this is a hands-on training, so bring your smart phones or tablets to take action developing your social media presence.

 

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Start Time - Mar-09-2017 @ 18:30 | End Time - Mar-09-2017 @ 20:00
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StoryShare

Come explore the art of storytelling. NUMU will host a monthly gathering celebrating the oral tradition of storytelling. Led by experienced members of the Storytelling Association of California (SAC), participants, from novice to expert, can both listen and have the opportunity to share their own stores. No experience necessary. Second Thursday of each month downstairs, in the NUMU Studio. Adult content, may not be appropriate for children.

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Start Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 21:00
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Wendy Mogel, Author of "Blessing of a Skinned Knee"

Dr. Wendy Mogel, clinical psychologist, parenting expert, and New York Times best-selling author of The Blessing of a Skinned Knee and The Blessing of a B-, will be giving a parenting talk this evening in the APJCC Auditorium.

Dr. Mogel's books address the question of how to raise resilient children in the face of trends toward anxious parenting and over-parenting

General admission is $18, JCC members $10. JCC members get a special early bird price of $7 when you buy tickets online by 3/15.

Copies of the books will be available for purchase.

For more information, contact the JCC's Center for Jewish Life & Learning at 408.357.7411 or [email protected].

 


The Dr. Wendy Mogel Distinguished Speaker Event is made possible, in part, by a  generous grant from the Jewish Federation of Silicon Valley and the Underwriting Sponsorship by Jack Moore & Bonnie Slavitt Moore.

The APJCC is proud to be a part of the Initiative on Jewish Peoplehood, co-funded by the Koret Foundation and the Taube Foundation for Jewish Life & Culture, and supported further by the Jewish Federation of Silicon Valley and other generous supporters.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-01-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-01-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-02-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-02-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-03-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-03-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-04-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-04-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-05-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-05-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-08-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-08-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-09-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-09-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-10-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-10-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-11-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-11-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-12-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-12-2017 @ 23:59
CHIcon

Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-15-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-15-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-16-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-16-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-17-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-17-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-18-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-18-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-19-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-19-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-22-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-22-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-24-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-24-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-26-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-26-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-29-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-29-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-31-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Mar-31-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Apr-01-2017 @ 00:00 | End Time - Apr-01-2017 @ 23:59
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Exhibit | Cement Prairie: The History and Legacy of the 1952 American Indian Urban Relocation Program

The Museum will be closed Thursday November 24th, December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st.  

Open from Nov 4, 2016 - Jun 25, 2017

Cement Prairie is an exhibition that explores the genesis, rollout and impact of the American Indian Relocation Program initiated by the US government in 1952. This significant yet little-known chapter in American Indian migration history will be viewed through a collection of personal stories, ephemera, primary source documents and support programming. The exhibition will focus specifically on the San Jose, California relocatee community and those who followed in their footsteps to the urban communities. The exhibit will examine the program's successes and failures, the rise of Indian activism in the 1960s, and how today's Pan-Indian community has adapted and preserves its native culture in the new "urban rez."

In the 1950s, America's general perceptions of Indians was formed by cultural and historical stereotypes of "the noble savage" wearing a feather headdress, living in a teepee, kidnapping women and children; or the Lone Ranger's stoic sidekick Tonto, characterized in popular literature. While these indelible images permeated American culture, the reality presented a stark contrast. The Indian reservation system became another failed attempt by the U.S. government to solve the "Indian Problem," and as a result, many Indians suffered in poverty and cultures began to erode.

In an attempt to address this problem, the US government created the Indian Urban Relocation Program in 1952 to move Native Americans to major metropolitan cities to improve the community's standard of living. In its first phase, an estimated 100,000 Indians left their reservations and settled in cities across the U.S. Today, over 70 percent of Native Americans live in urban centers, marking a significant migration period that has forever changed the Native American community and culture.o

"We are privileged to have this opportunity to work directly with our local Indian community and offer a forum where they can tell this little-known but important chapter in contemporary Native American history, " said Amy Long, NUMU history curator.

"The San Jose Indian community has long-attempted to create a visual platform to tell this story. We are very excited to partner with NUMU to make this dream a reality, explains exhibition advisor, Al Cross, Mandan/Hidatsa/Arikara, North Dakota.

In conjunction with this exhibition, NUMU is proud to present, Back From Extinction, an exhibition that focuses on the San Francisco Bay Area Native Indian tribe, the Muwekma Ohlone, and its struggle to gain federal recognition and its efforts to counter the myth of its extinction.

Cement Prairie is supported in part by San Jose State University's Anthropology Department, the Muwekma Ohlone tribe, the National Archives, The Bancroft Library, the Indian Health Center, Bay Area photographer, Ilka Hartmann, and notable Bay Area American Indian community members.

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Start Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 09:30 | End Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 11:30
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Walk with Compassion Silicon Valley, CA 2017

Walk With Compassion is the walk to end child poverty. Leading up to the walk, those of us in Silicon Valley are working together to raise life-changing funds benefitting children in the developing world suffering from extreme poverty. On March 25, 2017, we will come together at Vasona Park, Los Gatos, to celebrate the difference our efforts have made. At the walk, participants will journey through a true story of hope and redemption, learning about the real-life obstacles children in poverty face everyday. The short, family-friendly walk is intended for young and old. To find out how to participate, or to support a walk team or individual, visit WalkWithCompassion.com.

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Start Time - Mar-04-2017 @ 07:45 | End Time - Mar-04-2017 @ 10:00
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The Club at Los Gatos Community Run

Come join us for our Club Community Run! 

Happening every other month on the second Saturday at 7:45AM (with the exception of the Turkey Run).  
This event is open to all members and non-members and will be a 5 mile run/jog or a 3 mile walk with snacks to follow.

The dates are as follows: 

January 14th
March 11th
July 8th
September 9th
November 24th - Turkey Run

To sign up, please e-mail Sophia Smith and [email protected] 

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Start Time - Mar-03-2017 @ 13:00 | End Time - Mar-03-2017 @ 17:00
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Intro to Indigo Dyeing Drop-In | Ages 13 +

Explore the basics of dyeing indigo, learn new techniques, and practice creating patterns and varying color depth. Yards of muslin fabric will be provided, and participants are welcome to bring their own un-dyed cotton, linen, or silk fabrics as well. Please wear clothes you don't mind getting messy, as indigo will stain fabrics.

These workshops run every Friday in January & February.
For current event and program info for adults and kids, check out and subscribe to NUMU's Facebook Events: www.facebook.com/NewMuseumLosGatos/events

About the Instructor:
Zoë Umholtz is a graduate of the Oregon College of Art and Craft in Portland Oregon majoring in Fiber Arts. She has been living in California for the past three years, and has been rediscovering her love for natural indigo dyeing and working with small, local communities.

MakerSpace Program Founding Sponsor: The Michael and Alyce Parsons Foundation
Program Sponsors: Scott McDonald, Loann Nguyen, and Ceres Foundation / The Flick Family

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#LosGatosTown
#NUMU
#NewMuseumLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatos #SiliconValley #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #CraftLosGatos
#ThingsToDoInLosGatos #FridayFun #Tweens

Check out NUMU's events on Facebook!

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Start Time - Mar-04-2017 @ 13:00 | End Time - Mar-04-2017 @ 17:00
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Art Now Program | Observational Drawing from Still Life + Casts

The 2017 Art Now Spring Workshop Series offers Santa Clara County high school students the opportunity to practice and build their skills in the NUMU Atelier, a classical drawing and painting studio led by Atelier Director Gabriel Coke. The series will culminate in an Atelier Open House and life drawing session, as well as a Portfolio Review and Development Day offered by California College of the Arts.

Practice artistic observational skills to produce highly realistic drawings in a studio environment. Lessons will be in classical methods of rendering form in graphite, charcoal and chalk on a variety of papers. These skills apply to all areas of art, including modern digital media.

• Age | High School
• $40
• Max capacity: 8 students. Pre-registration Required

For additional information and questions of any kind, please contact Gabriel Coke at 831- 345-1845 or by email at [email protected]

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#HighSchoolArt #HighSchoolPortfolio #ArtPortfolio #TeenArt #ArtCollegeAdmission #LosGatosArtClass #LosGatosHighSchoolArt #ApplyingToArtSchool

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Start Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 12:00 | End Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 17:00
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Art Now Program | Portfolio Review + Open Studio - Free

*This Program is designed for High School age students.

Concluding our Spring Workshop Series, the portfolio review will be held on the final weekend of the 2017 Art Now high school juried exhibition Choices. Meet with faculty from California College of the Arts (CCA) and prospective students can receive feedback on their portfolios. The session will also provide students with an opportunity to learn more about the CCA curricula, faculty, and application process.

Our Open Studio will welcome new prospective students interested in developing their talents in drawing and painting. Drop in to observe, ask questions, or RSVP now for an individual introduction to classical methods of atelier training. We will be hosting a costumed portrait model from 1-4pm and offering open easels for drawing and painting in ideal studio conditions.

For additional information and questions of any kind, please contact Gabriel Coke at 831- 345-1845 or by email at [email protected]

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#HighSchoolArt #HighSchoolPortfolio #ArtPortfolio #TeenArt #ArtCollegeAdmission #LosGatosArtClass #CCA #CaliforniaCollegeOfTheArts #LosGatosHighSchoolArt #ApplyingToArtSchool #CaliforniaAcadamyOfArt

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Start Time - Mar-07-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Mar-07-2017 @ 20:00
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Town Council Meeting

The Los Gatos Town Council meet regularly on the first and third Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers.
 
Special meetings are called as necessary by the Mayor and noticed at least  24 hours in advance.

The public may review agenda and staff reports at the Los Gatos Library, 100 Villa Avenue or online at www.LosGatosCA.gov beginning at 7:00 p.m. the Thursday evening before each Council meeting, and at the Town Clerk's Office at 110 E. Main St. beginning Friday morning at 8:00 a.m.  The agenda and staff reports, including any additional material provided to Council after the distribution of the regular packet, are also available for viewing in the Council Chambers lobby during the Council meeting.

Written Comments
Members of the public may submit comments on Council agenda items via email, postal mail or hand-delivered prior to the Council meeting at which the item will be considered.  To ensure adequate time to prepare Council packets and adequate time for the Town Council to review public comments prior to the meeting, the Town Council has adopted the following policy:

  • For inclusion in the regular packet provided to Council Thursday evening, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. Thursday before the Council meeting.
  • For inclusion in any Addendum provided to Council Friday evening, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. Friday before the Council meeting.
  • For inclusion in any Desk Item provided to Council on the day of the Council meeting, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. on the day of the Council meeting.

Written comments should be sent to one or both of the following email addresses:
[email protected]
[email protected]

Or sent or hand-delivered to the following address:
Town Council
110 E. Main Street
Los Gatos, CA 95030

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Start Time - Mar-21-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Mar-21-2017 @ 23:55
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Town Council Meeting

Of the fifteen items on the agenda, the Town Council is scheduled to receive the 2016/17 Mid-Year Budget Performance and Status Report, approve plans and specifications for the Almond Grove Street Rehabilitation Project Phase II, and consider the Toll House Conditional Use Permit application. In addition, at 6:00 p.m. there will be a Building the Town's Budget: Budget Principles and Financial Update Study Session in Town Council Chambers.  



The Los Gatos Town Council meet regularly on the first and third Tuesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers.
 
Special meetings are called as necessary by the Mayor and noticed at least  24 hours in advance.

The public may review agenda and staff reports at the Los Gatos Library, 100 Villa Avenue or online at www.LosGatosCA.gov beginning at 7:00 p.m. the Thursday evening before each Council meeting, and at the Town Clerk's Office at 110 E. Main St. beginning Friday morning at 8:00 a.m.  The agenda and staff reports, including any additional material provided to Council after the distribution of the regular packet, are also available for viewing in the Council Chambers lobby during the Council meeting.

Written Comments
Members of the public may submit comments on Council agenda items via email, postal mail or hand-delivered prior to the Council meeting at which the item will be considered.  To ensure adequate time to prepare Council packets and adequate time for the Town Council to review public comments prior to the meeting, the Town Council has adopted the following policy:

  • For inclusion in the regular packet provided to Council Thursday evening, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. Thursday before the Council meeting.
  • For inclusion in any Addendum provided to Council Friday evening, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. Friday before the Council meeting.
  • For inclusion in any Desk Item provided to Council on the day of the Council meeting, public comments must be received by 11:00 a.m. on the day of the Council meeting.

Written comments should be sent to one or both of the following email addresses:
[email protected]
[email protected]

Or sent or hand-delivered to the following address:
Town Council
110 E. Main Street
Los Gatos, CA 95030

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-08-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Mar-08-2017 @ 23:55
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Planning Commission Meeting

General Information
The Planning Commission performs duties and exercises power and authority with regard to planning, subdivisions, zoning, zoning administration, and other land use regulatory controls as prescribed by ordinance and state law.

The Planning Commission consists of seven residents of the Town of Los Gatos, each serving a 4-year term. Applicants are asked by Council to demonstrate knowledge of the Town Code and its land use and planning policies.

The commission has several standing committees, and individual Planning Commissioners also represent the commission on a number of Council-appointed committees. Committee terms are for 1 year and are appointed by the Planning Commission Chair.

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Start Time - Mar-22-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Mar-22-2017 @ 23:55
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Planning Commission Meeting

General Information
The Planning Commission performs duties and exercises power and authority with regard to planning, subdivisions, zoning, zoning administration, and other land use regulatory controls as prescribed by ordinance and state law.

The Planning Commission consists of seven residents of the Town of Los Gatos, each serving a 4-year term. Applicants are asked by Council to demonstrate knowledge of the Town Code and its land use and planning policies.

The commission has several standing committees, and individual Planning Commissioners also represent the commission on a number of Council-appointed committees. Committee terms are for 1 year and are appointed by the Planning Commission Chair.

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Start Time - Mar-27-2017 @ 16:30 | End Time - Mar-27-2017 @ 18:00
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Board Meeting

Monthly Meeting of the Los Gatos Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors

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Start Time - Mar-16-2017 @ 18:00 | End Time - Mar-16-2017 @ 20:00
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Make + Mingle | St. Patrick's Eve with Loma Brewing Co.

We will be serving up a specialty craft brew generously offered by Loma Brewing Co. with a complementary arts + craft chaser. Explore the galleries and check out the Black Box Theater's current film screening. Oh, and bring your friends!

Ticket includes gallery admission, two drinks, craft project and materials. Wine and water will also be served. Your ticket(s) will be reserved under your name and available at the door.

Be the first to know about new Make + Mingle events, exhibits, or exciting program for adults or kids by subscribing to NUMU's Facebook events page

Purchase tickets in advance!
Ages 21+ | $20 Members | $25 General

Proceeds from Make + Mingle benefit the Musuem
NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#LomaBrew @LomaBrew #GetCrafteyHappyHour #MakeAndMingle #LosGatosMade #LosGatosArt #LosGatosTown #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #LosGatosNightLife #ThingsToDoInLosGatos #NUMU #MuseumLosGatos

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Start Time - Mar-28-2017 @ 17:00 | End Time - Mar-28-2017 @ 20:00
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Warriors Basketball Game & Beer Tasting at the JCC

Watch the Golden State Warriors take on the Houston Rockets on the BIG SCREEN in the APJCC Auditorium. Beer Tasting will be presented by Hopsy Incorporated. Hopsy will present five different beers to taste from local breweries.

$10 per person (JCC members free)

More info: Contact Jane at 408.357.7494 or [email protected]

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Start Time - Mar-04-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Mar-04-2017 @ 21:00
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South Bay Teen Idol Semi-Finals

Watch 20 of the South Bay's best teen vocalists compete in this annual competition. Ten of the contestants will be chosen tonight to advance to the finals in this annual competition.

This year's semi-finalists are:
 

  Abby Waterman Los Gatos High School
Ally Boles Westmont High School
Ava Congleton Willow Glen Middle School
Catherine Wellwood Leonard Herman Intermediate School
Fiona Fulton-Moskowitz Hillview Middle School
Julia Owens Pinewood High School
Kalista Hurel St. Andrew's Episcopal School
Kristen Champlin Leland High School
Kriya Pachipala Thornton Jr. High
Lyla Rose Neely Oakland School of the Arts
Maya Kurani Los Gatos High School
Nicole Baranchuk Westmont High School
Sabrina Kazemipour Sacred Heart Prep
Sheetal Rao Monta Vista High School
Sierra McKenna Christopher High School
Sophia Badame St. Andrew's Episcopal School
Sophie Huang Dublin High School
Trinity White Willow Glen Middle School
Varsha Horantur Saratoga High School

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Start Time - Mar-16-2017 @ 18:30 | End Time - Mar-16-2017 @ 21:45
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Israel Eats: Lecture and Film

Steven Rothfeld, a world-class photographer, spent several months traveling  through Israel to explore the vibrant food scene. His book "Israel Eats" is a delicious compilation of stories, recipes, and stunning photographs  of Israel’s food culture today. From north to south, Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, chefs and food growers have branched out from a vast  array of cultural influences and traditions in Israel’s history to create fresh, contemporary fusions and flavors.

The discussion will be followed by a screening of the film, In Search of Israeli Cuisine, (2016), director: Roger M. Sherman. This film that paints a portrait of  Israel and the Israeli people through local food. The feature length documentary puts a face on the culture of Israel, profiling chefs,  home cooks, vintners, and cheese-makers drawn from the more than one hundred cultures that make up Israel today – Jewish,  Arab, Muslim, Christian, Druze. 

To view the film trailer click here

Tickets $15 (JCC members $12)

Books will be available for purchase at the event.

Buy tickets online here .

More information: Shir Gal Kochavi, Cultural Arts Director, [email protected]

 


All Cultural Arts programs at the APJCC are made possible, in part, by generous contributions from Sylvia & Leonard Metz, Doris and Rick z"l Davis, and Bill Lister.

The APJCC is proud to be a part of the Initiative on Jewish Peoplehood, co-funded by the Koret Foundation, Taube Foundation for Jewish Life & Culture, the Jewish Federation of Silicon Valley, and other generous supporters.

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Start Time - Mar-19-2017 @ 11:30 | End Time - Mar-19-2017 @ 14:00
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Santa Clara Valley Watercolor Society Reception

The Addison-Penzak JCC is proud to host the Santa Clara Valley Watercolor Society's 49th Annual Member Show. It will be on display in the JCC's 2nd floor art gallery hallway March 1st-April 30th.

The public is invited to an artists' reception on Sunday, March 19th from 11:30am-2:00pm. Free.

Light refreshments will be served. 

For more information contact Shir Gal Kochavi: [email protected] or visit http://www.scvws.org/

 


All of the 2016-17 Art Exhibitions at the APJCC are made possible, in part, by a gift from Cookie Addison & Family.

All Cultural Arts programs at the APJCC are made possible, in part, by generous contributions from Sylvia & Leonard Metz, Doris and Rick z"l Davis, and Bill Lister.

The APJCC is proud to be a part of the Initiative on Jewish Peoplehood, co-funded by the Koret Foundation, Taube Foundation for Jewish Life & Culture, the Jewish Federation of Silicon Valley, and other generous supporters.

 

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Start Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 19:00 | End Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 21:00
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Wendy Mogel, "Raising Reslient Children in Anxious Times"

Dr. Wendy Mogel, clinical psychologist, parenting expert, and New York Times best-selling author of The Blessing of a Skinned Knee and The Blessing of a B-, will be giving a parenting talk this evening in the APJCC Auditorium.

Dr. Mogel's books address the question of how to raise resilient children in the face of trends toward anxious parenting and over-parenting

General admission is $18, JCC members $10. JCC members get a special early bird price of $7 when you buy tickets online by 3/15.

Copies of the books will be available for purchase.

For more information, contact the JCC's Center for Jewish Life & Learning at 408.357.7411 or [email protected].

 


The Dr. Wendy Mogel Distinguished Speaker Event is made possible, in part, by a  generous grant from the Jewish Federation of Silicon Valley and the Underwriting Sponsorship by Jack Moore & Bonnie Slavitt Moore.

The APJCC is proud to be a part of the Initiative on Jewish Peoplehood, co-funded by the Koret Foundation and the Taube Foundation for Jewish Life & Culture, and supported further by the Jewish Federation of Silicon Valley and other generous supporters.

Financial assistance is available to attend this event, through the generosity of the Arnie Addison Scholarship Fund. Click here to apply.

 

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Start Time - Mar-08-2017 @ 12:00 | End Time - Mar-08-2017 @ 13:00
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Conversation with the Chamber & Silicon Valley Clean Energy

Clean energy at competitive prices? It’s true and coming this April
 
Bring your lunch and join us for a Conversation with Pamela Leonard from Silicon Valley Clean Energy and Rob Rennie from Town Council.

Silicon Valley Clean Energy (SVCE) is your new official electricity provider, starting this April. Learn more about how SVCE is bringing 100% carbon-free electricity to Los Gatos at prices below PG&E. 

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Start Time - Mar-05-2017 @ 14:00 | End Time - Mar-05-2017 @ 15:00
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Ceremonial Destruction of the Cosmic Microwave Mandala

*Free with admission to NUMU
**Bring your own container to take part of the universe home with you!

Artist Rachel Sussman created a sand mandala for the exhibit Making Contact: SETI Artist in Residence. The Cosmic Microwave Mandala is an ephemeral artwork about eternity. Rachel Sussman weaves together the principles of physics, exploring the birth and nature of the universe, with the traditional Tibetan Buddhist practice of creating sand mandalas.

The mandala will be ceremoniously destroyed at the end of the exhibition in keeping with Buddhist beliefs on the transitory nature of life. Join us for the ceremonial destruction of the mandala, and if you come with a recyclable container you can bring home your own piece of the universe.

About the Artist
Rachel Sussman is a contemporary artist with a transdisciplinary practice blending art, science, and philosophy. Sussman is a Guggenheim, NYFA and MacDowell Colony Fellow, TED speaker, and author of New York Times bestselling book, The Oldest Living Things in the World. Her exhibition record spans more than a decade in museums and galleries in the US and Europe, and her photographs and writing have been featured on global media outlets including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, and NPR’s Picture Show.

Museum Hours
Wednesday 1pm-5pm | Thursday 11am-8pm | Friday - Sunday 11am-5pm

#CerimonialDestruction #SETI #BuddhistMandala #ArtandScience #SandMandala #LosGatosArt #ThingstoDoInLosGatos #SCIFRI #CosmicMicrowave #UniverseNow #Geekery #FamilyFunLosGatos #SiliconValleyEvent #LosGatosArt

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Start Time - Mar-02-2017 @ 18:00 | End Time - Mar-02-2017 @ 20:00
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Collecting 101: Getting Your Collection Started with Whitney Modern Fine Art Gallery

Have you ever thought about starting a collection, and wondered where to begin? Join museum professionals and gallerists as we discuss the basics. Includes how to approach gallerists, where to find art, and then how to start collecting!

NUMU And the Whitney Modern gallery present a series of workshops on collecting art, inspired by our current exhibition, A Call to Collect, which features works from the collections of three Los Gatos residents. Learn the basics of collecting art from experts across the museum, gallery, and conservation fields. Each workshop will be structured as an interactive seminar, providing participants the opportunity to ask experts both practical and theoretical questions about collecting art.

Resource sheets with contacts, information on art terms, galleries and actions will also be available. Online resources will be offered at each workshop, providing relevant and useful information for participants.

Additional Collecting 101 Classes:

3/30/2017 Collecting 101: Practical Guide to Collecting
Workshop held @ Whitney Modern Fine Art Gallery (24 N. Santa Cruz, 2nd Floor)
Buy your ticket at NUMU, online, or at the door!


4/27/17 Collecting 101: Collecting in the Long Term
Workshop held @ Whitney Modern Fine Art Gallery
(24 N. Santa Cruz, 2nd Floor)


#CollectingFineArt #Collections #LosGatosArt #HowToCollect #StartingaCollection #PreserveYourCollection #Chockies #GrandamasCollection #WhitneyModern #CollectionPreservation
#CollectingQuestions #Collectors #NetworkwithCollectors

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Start Time - Mar-12-2017 @ 13:00 | End Time - Mar-12-2017 @ 16:00
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MARCH MADNESS AT THE BUTTER PADDLE

MARCH MADNESS AT THE BUTTER PADDLE
Join us for game day treats and picnic items
Raffle ticket entry with purchase

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Start Time - Mar-11-2017 @ 07:45 | End Time - Mar-11-2017 @ 10:00
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March Community Run

Come join us for a Community Run on March 11th, 2017 at 7:45am. Participants will run/jog 5 miles or walk 3 miles starting and ending at The Club!

Open to all members and non-members and all levels of runners/joggers/walkers! 

To sign up contact [email protected] 

Hope to see you there!

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Start Time - Mar-11-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-11-2017 @ 14:00
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Los Gatos Saratoga Recreation Summer Camp Fair

Summer Enrichment School, Aquatics Programs, STEM Camps, Clubhouse/ Preschool Day Camps, Theater & Dance, Sports, Horseback Riding, Vasona Boating Camps, Multi-Media, Teen Leadership and more!

Demos- Raffles- Fun Activities - Slide - Free- Check us out!

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Start Time - Mar-21-2017 @ 12:00 | End Time - Mar-21-2017 @ 13:00
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Friends of the Library hosts SIlicon Valleyauthor, Adam Benforado

Author Adam Benforado
March 21, noon
Los Gatos Lodge
50 Saratoga Los Gatos Rd., Los Gatos

Cost: $20 for a buffet lunch or $5 beverage service only. Payment must be made by credit card at entry to event.
Reservation: Required for non-Rotary members; email SVReads@aol.com
*There will be a brief regular Rotary meeting before the speaker, but people should arrive before the start of the meeting so their arrival is not disruptive.

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Start Time - Mar-14-2017 @ 17:30 | End Time - Mar-14-2017 @ 19:00
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Business After Hours at Super Duper Burgers

Join us for our next Mixer at Super Duper Burgers!

Super Duper offers great burgers, fries, shakes and more!  All are made with fresh and locally-sourced ingredients.  You'll enjoy a sampling of their menu, along with a selection of wine and beer.

Don't forget to bring your business cards for a fun door prize and try your hand at a raffle prize! Spaces are limited, please RSVP. $10 for Members & $20 Prospective Members. RSVP Required.

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Start Time - Mar-19-2017 @ 09:00 | End Time - Mar-19-2017 @ 12:00
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OPEN HOUSE and FREE Classes at The Bar Method!

OPEN HOUSE
OWNERS STACY & SHADIN FREE ROUND ROBIN POP-UP CLASS
SUNDAY, MARCH 19
9:15 & 10:30 AM
 
Owners Stacy and Shadin will be co-teaching a special class. Stay after for bubbly, treats and shopping! Bring a friend for free!

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Start Time - Mar-17-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-17-2017 @ 23:00
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St Patrick's Day at C.B. Hannegan's 2017

It's that time of year again! St. Patrick's Day will be held on March 17th, 2017. Tickets will go on sale on February 15th and can ONLY be purchased at the bar. The cost of the tickets are $55.00 and include, food, entertainment and in/out privileges all day. Alcohol is sold separately. If you have any questions, please call the restaurant at 408-395-1233. We cannot wait to celebrate with everyone! Slainte!

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Start Time - Mar-17-2017 @ 10:00 | End Time - Mar-17-2017 @ 12:00
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IS DIABETES AFFECTING YOUR HEARING? DISCOVER MORE AND GET A FREE CLEAN & CHECK!

The Listen Up Café presents Christine Throm, Au.D., Friday, March 17th 10-12pm
With Special Guest Ruthie Fields, Nutrition and Weight Loss Coach


Based on a recent study from the National Institute of Health, hearing impairment was found to be twice as common among people with diabetes.
If you or a loved one has diabetes, there are more reasons than ever to watch your hearing health and we can help. This month we’ll discuss ways an audiologist can help prevent problems from progressive hearing loss. Join us and bring a friend!
 
RSVP (408) 354-1312 for your FREE Clean & Check and enjoy great coffee and goodies!
Los Gatos Audiology – 430 Monterey Ave, Suite 3, Los Gatos, CA 95030
 

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Start Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 10:00 | End Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 16:00
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Welcome Spring

Come join us to welcome spring! We?re putting together a fun day for local families to celebrate the new season. We'll have lots of entertainment for the youngest kids among us including a lady bug tent, a bouncy house, and a petting zoo from 10-12! 

In honor of spring (and because we love to help kids connect with nature), Mother Earth will make a visit between 12-2! The first hundred children to arrive will also receive a free seedling that they can take home to watch grow.

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Start Time - Mar-16-2017 @ 17:30 | End Time - Mar-16-2017 @ 18:30
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Universal Design/Small Houses -talk & networking

Come enjoy some networking and hear about Universal Design/Small Houses.
It’s free -networking with food from 5:30pm to 6:00pm, then a speaker.  “Bring business cards to put on the resource table.”

Alameda Family Funeral & Creamation and Our Lady of Fatima is co hosting Sernior Roundtable.

Please RSVP to [email protected]
 
Here is more about the speaker and topic: Universal Design/Small Houses

Description: Universal Design (UD) is the creation of products and environment so that they are usable by all people to the greatest extent possible. UD can make it possible for an aging homeowner to remain comfortably and safely in the home on an independent basis and for a longer time. Carrie incorporates UD features in the homes she designs and builds and promotes multigenerational living. Learn about the products and features that her company has to promote aging in place.

Bio: Carrie Shores is an architect who is improving people's lives through design focused within the aging population. By challenging the function and ease of everyday live, she makes our environment more accessible and adaptable, with or without disability. Her service coined ASAP (Architectural Solutions for the Aging Population) is designed to specifically address the lack of inspired housing available to seniors forecasted over the next 50 years. As Certified Age-In-Place specialist, her end goal is to create a barrier-free environment for her clients allowing them to live as independently and effortlessly as possible.

Carrie is a principal at Larson Shores Architects in the Bay Area. She has a Masters in Architecture from UC Berkeley. Carrie is both a Certified Age In Place Specialist and a LEED Accredited Professional.
 

 

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Start Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 10:00 | End Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 18:00
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SHOP FOR A CAUSE AT ROMANTIQUES

Shop for a Cause with the EMQ Auxiliary at ROMANTIQUES
March 30th - 10:00 - 6:00
51 University Ave. Los Gatos

A percentage of all sales on March 30th will be donated to the EMQ Auxiliary for the benefit of the EMQ Chidren's Fund. 100% of the donation goes to the children at Uplift Family Services, formerly EMQ FamiliesFirst.

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Start Time - Mar-08-2017 @ 16:00 | End Time - Mar-08-2017 @ 18:00
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Executive Committee Meeting 3/8/17

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Start Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 18:00 | End Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 20:00
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Collecting 101: Practical Guide to Collecting in the Long Term

Have you ever thought about starting a collection, and wondered where to begin? Join museum professionals and gallerists as we discuss the basics of obtaining and caring for your burgeoning collection. This workshop will also include some of the practical basics and best practices for caring for and displaying your collection. Workshop leaders will include gallerists and professional framers.

NUMU And the Whitney Modern gallery present a series of workshops on collecting art, inspired by our current exhibition, A Call to Collect, which features works from the collections of three Los Gatos residents. Learn the basics of collecting art from experts across the museum, gallery, and conservation fields. Each workshop will be structured as an interactive seminar, providing participants the opportunity to ask experts both practical and theoretical questions about collecting art.

Best for Ages: 13+

Resource sheet with vendor contacts and tips on framing, lighting and installation will be provided at this workshop. Online sources will be provided at each workshop, offering relevant and useful information to all participants.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601

#Collectables #KidsCollections #CuratingCollection #FineArtCollection #WhitneyModern #Antiques ##SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatosArt #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatos #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValley ##ThingsToDoInSouthBay #SilverCollection #EstateCollection #EstateSales #LosGatosHistorical

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Start Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 18:00 | End Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 20:00
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Collecting 101: Collecting in the Long Term

Once you’ve covered the best practices in obtaining and caring for your collection, our final workshop will look to caring for your collection in the long term. This will include how-to’s on protecting, growing, and lending your collection for exhibits. Expert panelists will include insurance companies, security, and collections management.

NUMU and the Whitney Modern gallery present a series of workshops on collecting art, inspired by NUMU’s current exhibition, A Call to Collect, which features works from the collections of three Los Gatos collectors. Learn the basics of collecting art from experts across the field, including gallerists, museum professionals, and conservators. The workshops will be structured as an interactive seminar, providing participants the opportunity to ask experts practical and theoretical questions about collecting art.

Resource sheet with insurance, security, and collections management vendor contacts will be available. Online sources will also be offered at each workshop providing relevant and useful information to all participants.

Space is limited, please purchase your ticket in advance. NUMU members are asked to RSVP to [email protected]

Best for Ages: 13+
Free with Admission to NUMU | Free for NUMU Members
Space is limited, please purchase your ticket in advance. NUMU members are asked to RSVP to [email protected]

Admissions
General Admission is $10
FREE for members and visitors under 18 years of age
$6 Seniors, military and students with valid ID

#CollectingFineArt #Collections #LosGatosArt #HowToCollect #StartingaCollection #PreserveYourCollection #Chockies #GrandamasCollection #WhitneyModern #CollectionPreservation
#CollectingQuestions #Collectors #NetworkwithCollectors

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Start Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 13:00 | End Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 14:00
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Los Gatos Library - What is the Most Tax Effective Withdrawal Strategy in Retirement

What is the Most Tax Effective Withdrawal Strategy in Retirement
Certified Financial Planner Larysa Prytula will be offering a free class on financial planning. Drop in. All are welcome.Certified

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Start Time - Mar-14-2017 @ 13:00 | End Time - Mar-14-2017 @ 14:00
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Los Gatos Library -Library eBooks101

Library eBooks 101
Are you new to using ebooks? This introductory class will give you the basic skills needed for getting started. Sign-up at the Adult Information Desk or by calling 408-354-6896

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Start Time - Mar-21-2017 @ 13:00 | End Time - Mar-21-2017 @ 14:00
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Los Gatos Library - Geneology for Beginners

Genealogy for Beginners
Learn how to trace your genealogy using Ancestry.com Library Edition and Heritage Quest for free. Get started with helpful tips to make your search easier and locate resources offering free genealogical help. Sign-up at the Adult Information Desk or by calling 408-354-6896.

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Start Time - Mar-28-2017 @ 16:30 | End Time - Mar-28-2017 @ 18:30
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Grill 57 - Complimentary Wine Tasting

Complimentary Wine Tasting
Featuring Ferrari-Carano

  • 2016 Pinot Grigio $10/glass, $40/ bottle
  • 2013 Reserve Chardonnay $62/ bottle
  • 2014 Anderson Valley Pinot Noir $50/bottle
  • 2014 Cabernet Sauvignon $16/glass, $54/bottle
  • 2012 Tresor $86/bottle
RSVP at 408-340-5736

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Start Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 17:00
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Abstracts From Life: Exploring the Bay Area Figurative Movement

Open March 24, 2017 - September 10, 2107
New Museum Los Gatos presents Abstracts From Life, an exhibition that explores the Bay Area Figurative movement, past and present.

Artists have studied the human figure throughout the ages. One regional expression of this practice is Bay Area Figurative, an art movement that emerged from California mid-20th century abstraction and continues as an enduring tradition. This group exhibition investigates the genesis of the Bay Area Figurative movement and features several generations of artists, including contemporary artists working locally and internationally.

The exhibition includes selections from private collections, galleries, the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, and the Oliveira Administrative Trust. Featured paintings, drawings and sculpture include works by: Michael Azgour, Joan Brown, Suhas Bhujbal, Linda Christensen, Richard Diebenkorn, Dennis Hare, Mitchell Johnson, Brigitte McReynolds, Nathan Oliveira, Joan Savo, Jennifer Pochinski, William Rushton, Terry St. John and James Weeks. Interactive activities that allow visitors to create their own figures will also be presented in the exhibition gallery.

“In the spirit of NUMU’s mission to tell stories of the Bay Area that reach the greater community and beyond in scope, innovation and interest, this exhibition highlights an important art movement that helped distinguish our region.” Says art curator, Marianne McGrath. “The locally connected and globally relevant artists in the exhibition have made significant contributions to art history and contemporary art.”

*Members Reception for Exhibition Opening: Abstracts From Life
Thursday April 13, 2017 | 6:00pm - 8:00pm
This evening is an opportunity for NUMU members to gather and celebrate with other NUMU supporters, exhibition sponsors, exhibiting artists and NUMU curators. A no-host bar will available at the museum.

Throughout the duration of the exhibition, NUMU will present a variety of related programs, including music performances, art talks, yoga and movement experiences.

Abstracts From Life: Bay Area Figurative Past and Present is generously supported by NUMU Curators’ Circle Members, the Daane Family. NUMU also gratefully acknowledges support from its many donors and members.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601
#SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatosArt #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatos #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValley #FigurativeArtMovement #BayAreaFigurative #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #midtwentiethcenturyart

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Start Time - Mar-24-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-24-2017 @ 17:00
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Abstracts From Life: Exploring the Bay Area Figurative Movement

Open March 24, 2017 - September 10, 2107
New Museum Los Gatos presents Abstracts From Life, an exhibition that explores the Bay Area Figurative movement, past and present.

Artists have studied the human figure throughout the ages. One regional expression of this practice is Bay Area Figurative, an art movement that emerged from California mid-20th century abstraction and continues as an enduring tradition. This group exhibition investigates the genesis of the Bay Area Figurative movement and features several generations of artists, including contemporary artists working locally and internationally.

The exhibition includes selections from private collections, galleries, the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, and the Oliveira Administrative Trust. Featured paintings, drawings and sculpture include works by: Michael Azgour, Joan Brown, Suhas Bhujbal, Linda Christensen, Richard Diebenkorn, Dennis Hare, Mitchell Johnson, Brigitte McReynolds, Nathan Oliveira, Joan Savo, Jennifer Pochinski, William Rushton, Terry St. John and James Weeks. Interactive activities that allow visitors to create their own figures will also be presented in the exhibition gallery.

“In the spirit of NUMU’s mission to tell stories of the Bay Area that reach the greater community and beyond in scope, innovation and interest, this exhibition highlights an important art movement that helped distinguish our region.” Says art curator, Marianne McGrath. “The locally connected and globally relevant artists in the exhibition have made significant contributions to art history and contemporary art.”

*Members Reception for Exhibition Opening: Abstracts From Life
Thursday April 13, 2017 | 6:00pm - 8:00pm
This evening is an opportunity for NUMU members to gather and celebrate with other NUMU supporters, exhibition sponsors, exhibiting artists and NUMU curators. A no-host bar will available at the museum.

Throughout the duration of the exhibition, NUMU will present a variety of related programs, including music performances, art talks, yoga and movement experiences.

Abstracts From Life: Bay Area Figurative Past and Present is generously supported by NUMU Curators’ Circle Members, the Daane Family. NUMU also gratefully acknowledges support from its many donors and members.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601
#SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatosArt #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatos #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValley #FigurativeArtMovement #BayAreaFigurative #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #midtwentiethcenturyart

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Start Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 17:00
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Abstracts From Life: Exploring the Bay Area Figurative Movement

Open March 24, 2017 - September 10, 2107
New Museum Los Gatos presents Abstracts From Life, an exhibition that explores the Bay Area Figurative movement, past and present.

Artists have studied the human figure throughout the ages. One regional expression of this practice is Bay Area Figurative, an art movement that emerged from California mid-20th century abstraction and continues as an enduring tradition. This group exhibition investigates the genesis of the Bay Area Figurative movement and features several generations of artists, including contemporary artists working locally and internationally.

The exhibition includes selections from private collections, galleries, the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, and the Oliveira Administrative Trust. Featured paintings, drawings and sculpture include works by: Michael Azgour, Joan Brown, Suhas Bhujbal, Linda Christensen, Richard Diebenkorn, Dennis Hare, Mitchell Johnson, Brigitte McReynolds, Nathan Oliveira, Joan Savo, Jennifer Pochinski, William Rushton, Terry St. John and James Weeks. Interactive activities that allow visitors to create their own figures will also be presented in the exhibition gallery.

“In the spirit of NUMU’s mission to tell stories of the Bay Area that reach the greater community and beyond in scope, innovation and interest, this exhibition highlights an important art movement that helped distinguish our region.” Says art curator, Marianne McGrath. “The locally connected and globally relevant artists in the exhibition have made significant contributions to art history and contemporary art.”

*Members Reception for Exhibition Opening: Abstracts From Life
Thursday April 13, 2017 | 6:00pm - 8:00pm
This evening is an opportunity for NUMU members to gather and celebrate with other NUMU supporters, exhibition sponsors, exhibiting artists and NUMU curators. A no-host bar will available at the museum.

Throughout the duration of the exhibition, NUMU will present a variety of related programs, including music performances, art talks, yoga and movement experiences.

Abstracts From Life: Bay Area Figurative Past and Present is generously supported by NUMU Curators’ Circle Members, the Daane Family. NUMU also gratefully acknowledges support from its many donors and members.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601
#SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatosArt #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatos #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValley #FigurativeArtMovement #BayAreaFigurative #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #midtwentiethcenturyart

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Start Time - Mar-26-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-26-2017 @ 17:00
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Abstracts From Life: Exploring the Bay Area Figurative Movement

Open March 24, 2017 - September 10, 2107
New Museum Los Gatos presents Abstracts From Life, an exhibition that explores the Bay Area Figurative movement, past and present.

Artists have studied the human figure throughout the ages. One regional expression of this practice is Bay Area Figurative, an art movement that emerged from California mid-20th century abstraction and continues as an enduring tradition. This group exhibition investigates the genesis of the Bay Area Figurative movement and features several generations of artists, including contemporary artists working locally and internationally.

The exhibition includes selections from private collections, galleries, the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, and the Oliveira Administrative Trust. Featured paintings, drawings and sculpture include works by: Michael Azgour, Joan Brown, Suhas Bhujbal, Linda Christensen, Richard Diebenkorn, Dennis Hare, Mitchell Johnson, Brigitte McReynolds, Nathan Oliveira, Joan Savo, Jennifer Pochinski, William Rushton, Terry St. John and James Weeks. Interactive activities that allow visitors to create their own figures will also be presented in the exhibition gallery.

“In the spirit of NUMU’s mission to tell stories of the Bay Area that reach the greater community and beyond in scope, innovation and interest, this exhibition highlights an important art movement that helped distinguish our region.” Says art curator, Marianne McGrath. “The locally connected and globally relevant artists in the exhibition have made significant contributions to art history and contemporary art.”

*Members Reception for Exhibition Opening: Abstracts From Life
Thursday April 13, 2017 | 6:00pm - 8:00pm
This evening is an opportunity for NUMU members to gather and celebrate with other NUMU supporters, exhibition sponsors, exhibiting artists and NUMU curators. A no-host bar will available at the museum.

Throughout the duration of the exhibition, NUMU will present a variety of related programs, including music performances, art talks, yoga and movement experiences.

Abstracts From Life: Bay Area Figurative Past and Present is generously supported by NUMU Curators’ Circle Members, the Daane Family. NUMU also gratefully acknowledges support from its many donors and members.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601
#SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatosArt #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatos #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValley #FigurativeArtMovement #BayAreaFigurative #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #midtwentiethcenturyart

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Start Time - Mar-27-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-27-2017 @ 17:00
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Abstracts From Life: Exploring the Bay Area Figurative Movement

Open March 24, 2017 - September 10, 2107
New Museum Los Gatos presents Abstracts From Life, an exhibition that explores the Bay Area Figurative movement, past and present.

Artists have studied the human figure throughout the ages. One regional expression of this practice is Bay Area Figurative, an art movement that emerged from California mid-20th century abstraction and continues as an enduring tradition. This group exhibition investigates the genesis of the Bay Area Figurative movement and features several generations of artists, including contemporary artists working locally and internationally.

The exhibition includes selections from private collections, galleries, the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, and the Oliveira Administrative Trust. Featured paintings, drawings and sculpture include works by: Michael Azgour, Joan Brown, Suhas Bhujbal, Linda Christensen, Richard Diebenkorn, Dennis Hare, Mitchell Johnson, Brigitte McReynolds, Nathan Oliveira, Joan Savo, Jennifer Pochinski, William Rushton, Terry St. John and James Weeks. Interactive activities that allow visitors to create their own figures will also be presented in the exhibition gallery.

“In the spirit of NUMU’s mission to tell stories of the Bay Area that reach the greater community and beyond in scope, innovation and interest, this exhibition highlights an important art movement that helped distinguish our region.” Says art curator, Marianne McGrath. “The locally connected and globally relevant artists in the exhibition have made significant contributions to art history and contemporary art.”

*Members Reception for Exhibition Opening: Abstracts From Life
Thursday April 13, 2017 | 6:00pm - 8:00pm
This evening is an opportunity for NUMU members to gather and celebrate with other NUMU supporters, exhibition sponsors, exhibiting artists and NUMU curators. A no-host bar will available at the museum.

Throughout the duration of the exhibition, NUMU will present a variety of related programs, including music performances, art talks, yoga and movement experiences.

Abstracts From Life: Bay Area Figurative Past and Present is generously supported by NUMU Curators’ Circle Members, the Daane Family. NUMU also gratefully acknowledges support from its many donors and members.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601
#SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatosArt #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatos #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValley #FigurativeArtMovement #BayAreaFigurative #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #midtwentiethcenturyart

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-28-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-28-2017 @ 17:00
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Abstracts From Life: Exploring the Bay Area Figurative Movement

Open March 24, 2017 - September 10, 2107
New Museum Los Gatos presents Abstracts From Life, an exhibition that explores the Bay Area Figurative movement, past and present.

Artists have studied the human figure throughout the ages. One regional expression of this practice is Bay Area Figurative, an art movement that emerged from California mid-20th century abstraction and continues as an enduring tradition. This group exhibition investigates the genesis of the Bay Area Figurative movement and features several generations of artists, including contemporary artists working locally and internationally.

The exhibition includes selections from private collections, galleries, the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, and the Oliveira Administrative Trust. Featured paintings, drawings and sculpture include works by: Michael Azgour, Joan Brown, Suhas Bhujbal, Linda Christensen, Richard Diebenkorn, Dennis Hare, Mitchell Johnson, Brigitte McReynolds, Nathan Oliveira, Joan Savo, Jennifer Pochinski, William Rushton, Terry St. John and James Weeks. Interactive activities that allow visitors to create their own figures will also be presented in the exhibition gallery.

“In the spirit of NUMU’s mission to tell stories of the Bay Area that reach the greater community and beyond in scope, innovation and interest, this exhibition highlights an important art movement that helped distinguish our region.” Says art curator, Marianne McGrath. “The locally connected and globally relevant artists in the exhibition have made significant contributions to art history and contemporary art.”

*Members Reception for Exhibition Opening: Abstracts From Life
Thursday April 13, 2017 | 6:00pm - 8:00pm
This evening is an opportunity for NUMU members to gather and celebrate with other NUMU supporters, exhibition sponsors, exhibiting artists and NUMU curators. A no-host bar will available at the museum.

Throughout the duration of the exhibition, NUMU will present a variety of related programs, including music performances, art talks, yoga and movement experiences.

Abstracts From Life: Bay Area Figurative Past and Present is generously supported by NUMU Curators’ Circle Members, the Daane Family. NUMU also gratefully acknowledges support from its many donors and members.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601
#SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatosArt #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatos #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValley #FigurativeArtMovement #BayAreaFigurative #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #midtwentiethcenturyart

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-29-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-29-2017 @ 17:00
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Abstracts From Life: Exploring the Bay Area Figurative Movement

Open March 24, 2017 - September 10, 2107
New Museum Los Gatos presents Abstracts From Life, an exhibition that explores the Bay Area Figurative movement, past and present.

Artists have studied the human figure throughout the ages. One regional expression of this practice is Bay Area Figurative, an art movement that emerged from California mid-20th century abstraction and continues as an enduring tradition. This group exhibition investigates the genesis of the Bay Area Figurative movement and features several generations of artists, including contemporary artists working locally and internationally.

The exhibition includes selections from private collections, galleries, the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, and the Oliveira Administrative Trust. Featured paintings, drawings and sculpture include works by: Michael Azgour, Joan Brown, Suhas Bhujbal, Linda Christensen, Richard Diebenkorn, Dennis Hare, Mitchell Johnson, Brigitte McReynolds, Nathan Oliveira, Joan Savo, Jennifer Pochinski, William Rushton, Terry St. John and James Weeks. Interactive activities that allow visitors to create their own figures will also be presented in the exhibition gallery.

“In the spirit of NUMU’s mission to tell stories of the Bay Area that reach the greater community and beyond in scope, innovation and interest, this exhibition highlights an important art movement that helped distinguish our region.” Says art curator, Marianne McGrath. “The locally connected and globally relevant artists in the exhibition have made significant contributions to art history and contemporary art.”

*Members Reception for Exhibition Opening: Abstracts From Life
Thursday April 13, 2017 | 6:00pm - 8:00pm
This evening is an opportunity for NUMU members to gather and celebrate with other NUMU supporters, exhibition sponsors, exhibiting artists and NUMU curators. A no-host bar will available at the museum.

Throughout the duration of the exhibition, NUMU will present a variety of related programs, including music performances, art talks, yoga and movement experiences.

Abstracts From Life: Bay Area Figurative Past and Present is generously supported by NUMU Curators’ Circle Members, the Daane Family. NUMU also gratefully acknowledges support from its many donors and members.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601
#SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatosArt #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatos #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValley #FigurativeArtMovement #BayAreaFigurative #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #midtwentiethcenturyart

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 17:00
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Abstracts From Life: Exploring the Bay Area Figurative Movement

Open March 24, 2017 - September 10, 2107
New Museum Los Gatos presents Abstracts From Life, an exhibition that explores the Bay Area Figurative movement, past and present.

Artists have studied the human figure throughout the ages. One regional expression of this practice is Bay Area Figurative, an art movement that emerged from California mid-20th century abstraction and continues as an enduring tradition. This group exhibition investigates the genesis of the Bay Area Figurative movement and features several generations of artists, including contemporary artists working locally and internationally.

The exhibition includes selections from private collections, galleries, the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, and the Oliveira Administrative Trust. Featured paintings, drawings and sculpture include works by: Michael Azgour, Joan Brown, Suhas Bhujbal, Linda Christensen, Richard Diebenkorn, Dennis Hare, Mitchell Johnson, Brigitte McReynolds, Nathan Oliveira, Joan Savo, Jennifer Pochinski, William Rushton, Terry St. John and James Weeks. Interactive activities that allow visitors to create their own figures will also be presented in the exhibition gallery.

“In the spirit of NUMU’s mission to tell stories of the Bay Area that reach the greater community and beyond in scope, innovation and interest, this exhibition highlights an important art movement that helped distinguish our region.” Says art curator, Marianne McGrath. “The locally connected and globally relevant artists in the exhibition have made significant contributions to art history and contemporary art.”

*Members Reception for Exhibition Opening: Abstracts From Life
Thursday April 13, 2017 | 6:00pm - 8:00pm
This evening is an opportunity for NUMU members to gather and celebrate with other NUMU supporters, exhibition sponsors, exhibiting artists and NUMU curators. A no-host bar will available at the museum.

Throughout the duration of the exhibition, NUMU will present a variety of related programs, including music performances, art talks, yoga and movement experiences.

Abstracts From Life: Bay Area Figurative Past and Present is generously supported by NUMU Curators’ Circle Members, the Daane Family. NUMU also gratefully acknowledges support from its many donors and members.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601
#SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatosArt #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatos #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValley #FigurativeArtMovement #BayAreaFigurative #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #midtwentiethcenturyart

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-31-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-31-2017 @ 17:00
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Abstracts From Life: Exploring the Bay Area Figurative Movement

Open March 24, 2017 - September 10, 2107
New Museum Los Gatos presents Abstracts From Life, an exhibition that explores the Bay Area Figurative movement, past and present.

Artists have studied the human figure throughout the ages. One regional expression of this practice is Bay Area Figurative, an art movement that emerged from California mid-20th century abstraction and continues as an enduring tradition. This group exhibition investigates the genesis of the Bay Area Figurative movement and features several generations of artists, including contemporary artists working locally and internationally.

The exhibition includes selections from private collections, galleries, the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, and the Oliveira Administrative Trust. Featured paintings, drawings and sculpture include works by: Michael Azgour, Joan Brown, Suhas Bhujbal, Linda Christensen, Richard Diebenkorn, Dennis Hare, Mitchell Johnson, Brigitte McReynolds, Nathan Oliveira, Joan Savo, Jennifer Pochinski, William Rushton, Terry St. John and James Weeks. Interactive activities that allow visitors to create their own figures will also be presented in the exhibition gallery.

“In the spirit of NUMU’s mission to tell stories of the Bay Area that reach the greater community and beyond in scope, innovation and interest, this exhibition highlights an important art movement that helped distinguish our region.” Says art curator, Marianne McGrath. “The locally connected and globally relevant artists in the exhibition have made significant contributions to art history and contemporary art.”

*Members Reception for Exhibition Opening: Abstracts From Life
Thursday April 13, 2017 | 6:00pm - 8:00pm
This evening is an opportunity for NUMU members to gather and celebrate with other NUMU supporters, exhibition sponsors, exhibiting artists and NUMU curators. A no-host bar will available at the museum.

Throughout the duration of the exhibition, NUMU will present a variety of related programs, including music performances, art talks, yoga and movement experiences.

Abstracts From Life: Bay Area Figurative Past and Present is generously supported by NUMU Curators’ Circle Members, the Daane Family. NUMU also gratefully acknowledges support from its many donors and members.

NUMU is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization tax ID 94-1619601
#SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #LosGatosArt #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatos #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValley #FigurativeArtMovement #BayAreaFigurative #ThingsToDoInSouthBay #midtwentiethcenturyart

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Start Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-23-2017 @ 17:00
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ArtNow: Annual Santa Clara County Juried High School Exhibition

Art Now is an annual Santa Clara County arts exhibition and educational program, sponsored by NUMU. Art Now offers an opportunity for high school student artists from Palo Alto to Gilroy to gain real-world experience at creating and presenting artwork in a competitive environment. NUMU offers a total of $10,000 in scholarships and awards to encourage students to pursue a profession in the visual arts.

NUMU thanks our generous sponsors: Michael & Alyce Parsons, Los Gatos Morning Rotary, Santa Clara County Office of Education, Waitte Foundation, University Art, Heritage Bank of Commerce, Rotary Club of Saratoga, and Valerie and John Hopkins.

#HighSchoolArt #LosGatosHighSchool #LosAltosHighSchool #GilroyHighSchool #PaloAltoHighSchool #TeenArt #CollegeBoundArtStudents #ArtClassesLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValleyArt #ThingsToDoInSouthBay

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Start Time - Mar-24-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-24-2017 @ 17:00
CHIcon

ArtNow: Annual Santa Clara County Juried High School Exhibition

Art Now is an annual Santa Clara County arts exhibition and educational program, sponsored by NUMU. Art Now offers an opportunity for high school student artists from Palo Alto to Gilroy to gain real-world experience at creating and presenting artwork in a competitive environment. NUMU offers a total of $10,000 in scholarships and awards to encourage students to pursue a profession in the visual arts.

NUMU thanks our generous sponsors: Michael & Alyce Parsons, Los Gatos Morning Rotary, Santa Clara County Office of Education, Waitte Foundation, University Art, Heritage Bank of Commerce, Rotary Club of Saratoga, and Valerie and John Hopkins.

#HighSchoolArt #LosGatosHighSchool #LosAltosHighSchool #GilroyHighSchool #PaloAltoHighSchool #TeenArt #CollegeBoundArtStudents #ArtClassesLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValleyArt #ThingsToDoInSouthBay

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Start Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-25-2017 @ 17:00
CHIcon

ArtNow: Annual Santa Clara County Juried High School Exhibition

Art Now is an annual Santa Clara County arts exhibition and educational program, sponsored by NUMU. Art Now offers an opportunity for high school student artists from Palo Alto to Gilroy to gain real-world experience at creating and presenting artwork in a competitive environment. NUMU offers a total of $10,000 in scholarships and awards to encourage students to pursue a profession in the visual arts.

NUMU thanks our generous sponsors: Michael & Alyce Parsons, Los Gatos Morning Rotary, Santa Clara County Office of Education, Waitte Foundation, University Art, Heritage Bank of Commerce, Rotary Club of Saratoga, and Valerie and John Hopkins.

#HighSchoolArt #LosGatosHighSchool #LosAltosHighSchool #GilroyHighSchool #PaloAltoHighSchool #TeenArt #CollegeBoundArtStudents #ArtClassesLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValleyArt #ThingsToDoInSouthBay

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-26-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-26-2017 @ 17:00
CHIcon

ArtNow: Annual Santa Clara County Juried High School Exhibition

Art Now is an annual Santa Clara County arts exhibition and educational program, sponsored by NUMU. Art Now offers an opportunity for high school student artists from Palo Alto to Gilroy to gain real-world experience at creating and presenting artwork in a competitive environment. NUMU offers a total of $10,000 in scholarships and awards to encourage students to pursue a profession in the visual arts.

NUMU thanks our generous sponsors: Michael & Alyce Parsons, Los Gatos Morning Rotary, Santa Clara County Office of Education, Waitte Foundation, University Art, Heritage Bank of Commerce, Rotary Club of Saratoga, and Valerie and John Hopkins.

#HighSchoolArt #LosGatosHighSchool #LosAltosHighSchool #GilroyHighSchool #PaloAltoHighSchool #TeenArt #CollegeBoundArtStudents #ArtClassesLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValleyArt #ThingsToDoInSouthBay

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-27-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-27-2017 @ 17:00
CHIcon

ArtNow: Annual Santa Clara County Juried High School Exhibition

Art Now is an annual Santa Clara County arts exhibition and educational program, sponsored by NUMU. Art Now offers an opportunity for high school student artists from Palo Alto to Gilroy to gain real-world experience at creating and presenting artwork in a competitive environment. NUMU offers a total of $10,000 in scholarships and awards to encourage students to pursue a profession in the visual arts.

NUMU thanks our generous sponsors: Michael & Alyce Parsons, Los Gatos Morning Rotary, Santa Clara County Office of Education, Waitte Foundation, University Art, Heritage Bank of Commerce, Rotary Club of Saratoga, and Valerie and John Hopkins.

#HighSchoolArt #LosGatosHighSchool #LosAltosHighSchool #GilroyHighSchool #PaloAltoHighSchool #TeenArt #CollegeBoundArtStudents #ArtClassesLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValleyArt #ThingsToDoInSouthBay

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-28-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-28-2017 @ 17:00
CHIcon

ArtNow: Annual Santa Clara County Juried High School Exhibition

Art Now is an annual Santa Clara County arts exhibition and educational program, sponsored by NUMU. Art Now offers an opportunity for high school student artists from Palo Alto to Gilroy to gain real-world experience at creating and presenting artwork in a competitive environment. NUMU offers a total of $10,000 in scholarships and awards to encourage students to pursue a profession in the visual arts.

NUMU thanks our generous sponsors: Michael & Alyce Parsons, Los Gatos Morning Rotary, Santa Clara County Office of Education, Waitte Foundation, University Art, Heritage Bank of Commerce, Rotary Club of Saratoga, and Valerie and John Hopkins.

#HighSchoolArt #LosGatosHighSchool #LosAltosHighSchool #GilroyHighSchool #PaloAltoHighSchool #TeenArt #CollegeBoundArtStudents #ArtClassesLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValleyArt #ThingsToDoInSouthBay

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-29-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-29-2017 @ 17:00
CHIcon

ArtNow: Annual Santa Clara County Juried High School Exhibition

Art Now is an annual Santa Clara County arts exhibition and educational program, sponsored by NUMU. Art Now offers an opportunity for high school student artists from Palo Alto to Gilroy to gain real-world experience at creating and presenting artwork in a competitive environment. NUMU offers a total of $10,000 in scholarships and awards to encourage students to pursue a profession in the visual arts.

NUMU thanks our generous sponsors: Michael & Alyce Parsons, Los Gatos Morning Rotary, Santa Clara County Office of Education, Waitte Foundation, University Art, Heritage Bank of Commerce, Rotary Club of Saratoga, and Valerie and John Hopkins.

#HighSchoolArt #LosGatosHighSchool #LosAltosHighSchool #GilroyHighSchool #PaloAltoHighSchool #TeenArt #CollegeBoundArtStudents #ArtClassesLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValleyArt #ThingsToDoInSouthBay

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-30-2017 @ 17:00
CHIcon

ArtNow: Annual Santa Clara County Juried High School Exhibition

Art Now is an annual Santa Clara County arts exhibition and educational program, sponsored by NUMU. Art Now offers an opportunity for high school student artists from Palo Alto to Gilroy to gain real-world experience at creating and presenting artwork in a competitive environment. NUMU offers a total of $10,000 in scholarships and awards to encourage students to pursue a profession in the visual arts.

NUMU thanks our generous sponsors: Michael & Alyce Parsons, Los Gatos Morning Rotary, Santa Clara County Office of Education, Waitte Foundation, University Art, Heritage Bank of Commerce, Rotary Club of Saratoga, and Valerie and John Hopkins.

#HighSchoolArt #LosGatosHighSchool #LosAltosHighSchool #GilroyHighSchool #PaloAltoHighSchool #TeenArt #CollegeBoundArtStudents #ArtClassesLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValleyArt #ThingsToDoInSouthBay

Event Details / Register

Start Time - Mar-31-2017 @ 11:00 | End Time - Mar-31-2017 @ 17:00
CHIcon

ArtNow: Annual Santa Clara County Juried High School Exhibition

Art Now is an annual Santa Clara County arts exhibition and educational program, sponsored by NUMU. Art Now offers an opportunity for high school student artists from Palo Alto to Gilroy to gain real-world experience at creating and presenting artwork in a competitive environment. NUMU offers a total of $10,000 in scholarships and awards to encourage students to pursue a profession in the visual arts.

NUMU thanks our generous sponsors: Michael & Alyce Parsons, Los Gatos Morning Rotary, Santa Clara County Office of Education, Waitte Foundation, University Art, Heritage Bank of Commerce, Rotary Club of Saratoga, and Valerie and John Hopkins.

#HighSchoolArt #LosGatosHighSchool #LosAltosHighSchool #GilroyHighSchool #PaloAltoHighSchool #TeenArt #CollegeBoundArtStudents #ArtClassesLosGatos #SouthBayArt #ArtLosGatos #ExploreLosGatos #LosGatosTown #LosGatosChamberofCommerce #SiliconValleyArt #ThingsToDoInSouthBay

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Start Time - Mar-24-2017 @ 10:00 | End Time - Mar-24-2017 @ 17:30
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VINTAGE EVENT. Uniqueness, nostalgic quality the modern is simply not.

Vintage Event at the American Cancer Society Discovery Shop Los Gatos. Vintage is about Uniqueness, stories of those who came before us and a wonderful nostalgic quality that modern is simply not. Jewelry, Dishes, Silver, Clothing and more .
Visit your local Discovery Shop Los Gatos located on 39, E. Main Street, 95030. Together are stronger and we move towards a world free from the suffering and pain of Cancer.

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Start Time - Mar-20-2017 @ 16:30 | End Time - Mar-21-2017 @ 18:30
farmers market

Ongoing events in Los Gatos

The Farmer's Market

Check out the Los Gatos Farmer’s Market every Sunday (except Easter Sunday and Christmas Sunday). It is located around Plaza Park in downtown Los Gatos, on Montebello Way and Broadway Ave.
Hours are from 8:30am to 1:00pm during the Spring and Summer months and 9:00am to 1:00pm during Fall and Winter.
Contact South Bay Farmers’ Market at 408-353-4293.

Great classes at...

Los Gatos/Saratoga Rec. Center (354-8700)
LGS Recreation and Jewish Community Center (358-3636)- JCC
West Valley College - www.westvalley.edu